photography

Anja Niemi – ‘The Woman Who Never Existed’

Anja Niemi‘s new series ‘The Woman Who Never Existed‘ – the comfort with our inner private world.
 
The photographs were inspired by the words of the pioneering Italian actress Eleonora Duse – “away from the stage I do not exist”.
What is it about these words that made such an impression to the Norwegian photographer? “I could see everything right away, a story of an actress who started to disappear when no one was looking. Even though the quote is almost a century old, it’s so current. Sadly, I think many people can relate to that in our time.” 
 
Eleonora worked at the international theater stage alongside Sara Bernhardt in the early 20th century but in contrast to Bernhardt’s outgoing personality, Duse was introverted and private, rarely giving interviews.
Anja Niemi - The Woman Who Never Existed

Anja Niemi – The Woman Who Never Existed

 

Aaron Ansarov – ‘Portuguese Man of War’

Aaron Ansarov’s colouful and vibrant series ‘Portuguese Man of War‘ is his tribute to these delicate, fascinating, complex and quite dangerous marine creatures. His kaleidoscopic images inspire the imagination seeing different interpretations like aliens, demons, angels…

Aaron Ansarov -Portuguese Man of War

Aaron Ansarov -Portuguese Man of War

 

Due to its outward appearance Portuguese Man of War would likely be mistaken for a jellyfish but it’s not. Actually it’s not even an “it,” but a “they”. Unlike jellyfish it is not a single multicellular organism, but a colonial one made up of specialized individual animals of the same species working together. The most interesting fact is that its venomous tentacles can deliver a painful sting, which can be fatal.

“How can something responsible for thousands of stings around the world each year be so beautiful? It is not my place to save these creatures, but I feel I am doing them a great service by giving them a beautiful voice and legacy that will last.”

Take a close-up look at Aaron Ansarov’s ‘Portuguese Man of War’ in this short video created by National Geographic.

 

Luigi Ghirri

Luigi Ghirri (1943 – 1992) was an Italian photographer who, beginning in the 1970s, produced pioneering color photographs of landscape and architecture within the milieu of conceptual art. Ghirri’s photographs are presented with a deadpan, often ironic wit and always consider the tenuous balance between people and their surroundings. He worked in series, photographing parks, beaches, and urban scenes of his native Italy, producing modestly sized, meticulously made prints. His use of color has been lauded for its capacity to express “both prescience and nostalgia” in its distinct encapsulation of the first wave of color photography (artist review by Matthew Marks Gallery – the official representative of the Estate of Luigi Ghirri)

Luigi Ghirri

Luigi Ghirri

 

“The daily encounter with reality, the fictions, the surrogates, the ambiguous, poetic or alienating aspects, all seem to preclude any way out of the labyrinth, the walls of which are ever more illusory… to the point at which we might merge with them… The meaning that I am trying to render through my work is a verification of how it is still possible to desire and face a path of knowledge, to be able finally to distinguish the precise identity of man, things, life, from the image of man, things, and life.’”

‘Kodachrome’ is now available either digitally by MAPP or physically by MACK.

 

Tommy Ingberg – ‘Reality Rearranged’

Tommy Ingberg‘s stories about human nature in surrealistic photo montages.

“This is a series of black and white, surrealistic photo montages. The pictures start off with a feeling, a story, a riddle for the viewer to think about. I strive for simple, scaled back compositions with few elements, where every part adds to the story, but where there are still gaps for the viewer to fill.”

Tommy Ingberg - Reality Rearranged

Tommy Ingberg – Reality Rearranged

 

“For me, surrealism is about trying to explain something abstract like a feeling or a thought, expressing the subconscious with a picture. The Reality Rearranged series is my first try at describing reality trough surrealism. During the five years I have worked on the series I have used my own inner life, thoughts and feelings as seeds to my pictures. In that sense the work is very personal, almost like a visual diary.
Despite this subjectiveness in the process I hope that the work can engage the viewer in her or his own terms. I want the viewers to produce their own questions and answers when looking at the pictures, my own interpretations are really irrelevant in this context.”