photography

Ann Rhoney

Ann Rhoney – a photographer with painterly sensitivity to color and light. 

In 1980 to overcome the expressive limitation of commercially produced colour film, the artist started to apply by hand thin layers of oil pigment on top of black and white gelatin silver prints. The result was works with great chromatic subtlety and un-real effect in the tradition of the Photo-Pictorialists during the early 20th century.

Ann Rhoney

Ann Rhoney

 

Ann Rhoney is the artist who coloured now iconic photograph of David Kirby used as ads by Benetton in 1992. The original photograph is black and white, taken by Therese Frare and published for the first time in LIFE magazine. Still the topic about the proper use of the photograph remains controversial, but none has disputed the amazing work of Ann Rhoney.

 

Pep Ventosa – ‘Street Lamps’

Pep Ventosa’s series ‘Street Lamps’ – surreal portraits with watercolour texture of these often neglected pieces of the city landscape as solitary urban sculptures and construction of a new reality of visual experience from different views and angles.

“Using overlaid shots of the lamps set against their habitat of trees, buildings, cars and people, the images are tinged with the colour, movement and atmosphere of different neighbourhoods in Paris, San Francisco, New York, Barcelona and other cities.”

Pep Ventosa - Street Lamps

Pep Ventosa – Street Lamps

 

Marius Schultz – ‘A conversation with Nature’

Marius Schultz’s timeless story ‘A conversation with Nature’ – watching the daily world in searching for the links that get things together in a circle of life.

“Many of the images were taken in the same place — practically in my backyard — but at different times, in different seasons, over the course of years and years (the projected started in 2005). I have always been fascinated by trees, water and people to engage with the fundamental wholeness of nature.”

Marius Schultz - A conversation with Nature

Marius Schultz – A conversation with Nature

 

“My first images were at a local lake at night. It was early spring. There were some cows on the field. I shot a whole roll of film. Afterwards I was very disappointed with the result. It didn´t turn out the way I saw it. That was 40 years ago.

Today I have complete different approach. Today I wonder more about the “Why?” Why did I go out of night to shoot? What kind of mystery where I hoping for? What was I thinking? It was my first roll of film. I could have no expectations.

The answer was there all in front of me: I chose nature – not the city lights, I chose night, not day. I chose spring, not winter – and so on. I needed a camera to observe the essence of nature, and start a conversation. I need the conversation to understand myself, the world, our universe.”

 

Marius Schultz - A conversation with Nature

Marius Schultz – A conversation with Nature

 

A conversation with Nature’ is published as a photo book by Damiani.

 

Bernard Plossu – ‘Couleur Fresson’

”Photography doesn’t capture time, but evokes it. It flows endlessly like fine sand, and the changing landscapes change nothing.”

French photographer Bernard Plossu started taking photographs by chance in Mexico in 1965 and since then for over 50 years he has never stopped, creating sensual images with a unique style that can be identified as his own. He has captured landscapes around the world predominantly in black and white but lately, using the Fresson carbon printing process, he has begun to embrace the color.

Bernard Plossu - Couleur Fresson

Bernard Plossu – Couleur Fresson

 

“The Fresson process is a rare and unique way to print color: it can be called “charcoal printing” as well. The grandfather, Theodore Henri, invented the process in 1899 and his son Pierre followed up. Later Michel and now Jean François—four generations, in all—carry on the tradition. What’s special is that it produces a particular mood, with a kind of grain that gives the land and the skies a matte sensation. It makes my pictures somehow peaceful and not at all tape à l’ oeil [flashy]. There is nothing glossy here, nothing spectacular, just the opposite, which is what I am looking for.”

 

Cássio Campos Vasconcellos – ‘A Picturesque Voyage Through Brazil’

Cássio Campos Vasconcellos’s ‘A Picturesque Voyage Through Brazil’ –  a series “inspired by paintings of European artists (Johann Moritz Rugendas, Jean-Baptiste Debret, Hercules Florence, Conde de Clarac, Aimé-Adrien Taunay, Carl von Martius and others) who came to Brazil in the early 19th  century to paint and show the beauty and exuberance of Brazilian forests.”

Cássio Campos Vasconcellos - A Picturesque Voyage Through Brazil

Cássio Campos Vasconcellos – A Picturesque Voyage Through Brazil

 

Chrystel Lebas – ‘Hidden Nature’

Chrystel Lebas’s ‘Hidden Nature’ – made in twilight lyrical photographs of ‘nests’ of feathers left behind a bird killed by a wild animal reveal the drama of the invisible mysterious elements of the natural world.

Chrystel Lebas - Hidden Nature

Chrystel Lebas – Hidden Nature

 

“Walking alone in the forest recording close up scenes or tableaux, I attempted to reveal the hidden side of nature, the nature we have glorified forgetting its real harshness and purpose, questioning man’s relationship with the natural environment and man’s response to a lost wilderness. The Photographs are taken with a medium format camera, instead of showing wide expense of space, here we are looking close-up at the subject, scrutinizing it.”

 

Chan Dick – ‘Chai Wan Fire Station’

Chan Dick’s series ‘Chai Wan Fire Station‘ – the routine of this small unusual space and artist’s subtle tribute to firefighters and appreciation to many possibilities for stories you can find with a bit of luck.

Chan Dick - Chai Wan Fire Station

Chan Dick – Chai Wan Fire Station

 

“One day I was busy in my workshop when I heard a noise coming from the bathroom. Curious, I opened the window, looked down and saw firefighters playing volleyball. What I saw was more eventful than I thought. The scene was surreally picturesque for a coincidental discovery. For the following 15 months, I dedicated myself to observation, patiently waiting for the next unexpected scene, all happening within this little square area that I framed from above.”

Available as a photo book.

 

Denis Brihat

Denis Brihat – capturing the simplicity of the eternity in vivid and luminous photography.

Denis Brihat - Nature

Denis Brihat – Nature

 

“While some photographers are related to the race of hunters, Denis Brihat belongs to the peaceful tribe of gatherers. A practical philosopher, at an early age he decided to cultivate his garden. A poet of the image, he celebrated the beauty of the world by creating a number of blazons in honor of the delectable manna it showers on us: flowers and fruit, vegetables, trees and a few less domesticated specimens of the plant kingdom, which seemed to him to epitomize all the riches whereby Nature liberally contributes to human happiness. This is because he looked upon the world from his garden or, when roaming the world, was guided by the reverie of a serene gardener.”  Georges Monti

 

Denis Brihat - Nature

Denis Brihat – Nature

 

“When Brihat enlarges a slice of lemon to the size of a cathedral rose window, when he puts a single acacia seed or spike of lavender on a neutral background – a background of nothingness – he raises these tiny harbingers to the power of the cosmos, and infinity is certainly what he intends to possess, infinity withdrawn from the wear of time, an eternal infinity.” Michel Tournier

“Do you know what his worst enemy is?

Tell me.

The wind. The wind that makes flowers move.”

(from The Short Story and Photography, 1880’s-1980’s)

 

Lauren Semivan – ‘Observatory’

Lauren Semivan’s series ‘Observatory’ – “ghosts of previous drawings create a sense of time suspended, evoking gesture, atmosphere and memory… an access to the extraordinary, to keep a record of dreams, and to employ the unknown.”

Lauren Semivan - Observatory

Lauren Semivan – Observatory

 

“In scientific disciplines, a line is classified as an event. Something as primitive as a scrawl on a surface reveals an aggregate of events, intersecting and changing course.  Drawings made on the seamless backdrop describe an emotional space.

Science is inherently experiential, as is art making. Knowing and feeling are not separate, and the whole of the environment can be used as a pedagogic instrument. My ongoing body of work elegantly draws upon a tension that exists between irrational and physical worlds.”

 

Laetitia Lesaffre – ‘Breathe’

Laetitia Lesaffre’s series ‘Breathe’ – “But, said Alice, if the world has absolutely no sense, who’s stopping us from inventing one?” Lewis Carroll.

Laetitia Lesaffre’s luminous floating world arise from darkness, a blurred world between dream and reality.

 “I am a lacquer painter and photographer, and all my work explore reflection: I take the picture of the subject in reflection in my lacquered canvas. I aim to dissolve the frontier between painting and photography.”

Laetitia Lesaffre - Breathe

Laetitia Lesaffre – Breathe