photography

Josef Hoflehner – Jet Airliner

Josef Hoflehner’s Jet Airliner series comprises of high key photographs of low-flying planes over the heads of sunbathers at Maho Beach on the Dutch/French island of St. Maarten / St. Martin in the Caribbean Sea.  The beach is directly adjacent to the relatively short runway of the airport, therefore passenger jets roar as low as four meters above the holiday-makers.

The photographs were taken over a period  between early 2009 and late 2011 and 86 of them are published in the book ” Jet Airliner: The Complete Works

Josef Hoflehner - Jet Airliner

Josef Hoflehner – Jet Airliner

 

Toni Catany – the Spanish ‘poet of photography’

Toni Catany – the Spanish “poet of photography”. Manuel Forcano, couldn’t say it better.

Toni Catany

Toni Catany

Treated with a very particular sensibility and highly personal aesthetics, the bodies or objects that become the protagonists of his photographs are truly like the words of a poem: essential, revealing, indispensable, deep and echoing. Hence, we can say that, in his lyricism and indisputable mastery of light, Toni Catany is a poet of photography

Toni Catany

Toni Catany

In Toni Catany’s photographs dictates his sensitivity. It all about his feelings. “They are not complicated stories but rather certain feelings that I communicate through the choice of object, fruits, flowers, or colours. But they are always autobiographical.” He used photography as a reflection of his inner universe and not as a mirror of the real and external world. “I transform what I see and try to make the photos flow from within me”

Toni Catany

Toni Catany

Portraits of unknown people, landscapes (especially from Mediterranean), nudes, carefully planned still lifes – every element has a lyrical quality and beautiful mystery that reveals his silent soul.

Toni Catany

Toni Catany

“I have an obsession with the passage of time”, states the artist, and his photographs are liked by people from everywhere. “The best thing of all, though, is that one perceives that Toni Catany has enjoyed taking them.”

Toni Catany

Toni Catany

No official web site or social media, but he has published a lot of books and in this video he shares his life path experience and artistic thoughts.

Toni Catany (Llucmajor, Majorca, 1942 – Barcelona, 2013)

 

The Botanical Anthology of KARL BLOSSFELDT (1865-1932) – part 2

What was so unique in the works of Blossfeldt?

Karl Blossfeldt

Karl Blossfeldt

 

Obviously he had adopted the Meurer’s conception and was inspired by the artistic structure and architectural elegance of the plants. He was intrigued with every component of the plant – flowers, buds, seed capsules, roots, tendrils, pods, twigs.

“The plant never lapses into mere arid functionalism; it fashions and shapes according to logic and suitability, and with its primeval force compels everything to attain the highest artistic form,” he said.

But reviewing the diverse art movements at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th the use of botanical motifs was not something innovative. Actually they were very popular, especially in the Art Nouveau designs.

Karl Blossfeldt

Karl Blossfeldt

 

The uniqueness is in the original way he captured them: magnification, sharp focus, balanced arrangement, neutral background, high contrast and diffused lightening with only slightest grey shadows beneath the objects.

With his homemade camera he could reach a magnification up to 30x times of the genuine size; an amplification common for what is called now macro photography. This along with the sharp focus reveal extraordinary details of a plant natural structure and shape and provides a visual access to its beauty and lucidity. The trend in photography that time was for elaborate backgrounds, but Blossfeldt’s compositions distinguished with centered plants against a plain monochromatic ground. The viewer should not have to be destructed in his investigation of the object. Showing the finest features of a plant in an isolated contest emphasize their inwardness and expose the individuality and the character of each of them.

Karl Blossfeldt

Karl Blossfeldt

 

After the success of his 1st book in 1928, Blossfeldt was persuaded by Nierendorf to collect another 120 of his photos and in 1932 was published his 2nd book – Wundergarten der Natur (Magic Garden of Nature), again making a phenomenal impact as the previous one and winning him a recognition as one of the key photographers of the 20th century.

Karl Blossfeldt

Karl Blossfeldt

 

Returning to that student exhibition we started… Through the eyes of the past years what else we could add to ‘captivating, outstanding, breathtaking’ when describing the Blossfeldt’s works? Surely a lot, but only one stands out – ‘classical’. Though almost a century has been passed, these graphic black and white photos continue to excite and impress the public. They remain unique and at the same time modern as if they were created nowadays. And apart of their artistic value, they haven’t lost their main purpose and still could be used as teaching materials. Something that probably for Blossfeldt would be the greatest reward.

Karl Blossfeldt

Karl Blossfeldt

 

Karl Blossfeld’s photographs nowadays are published in many photo books.

 

 

The Botanical Anthology of KARL BLOSSFELDT (1865-1932) – part 1

Imagine you are an art dealer and as you are viewing a student exhibition, suddenly you face to these photographs…

Karl Blossfeldt

Karl Blossfeldt

 

‘Captivating, outstanding, breathtaking!’ That was probably what Karl Nierendorf, an art dealer and owner of a gallery in Berlin, thought that moment almost a century ago, in 1926. He was so impressed by what he saw, that immediately arranged with the artist who had created them, an exhibition at his own gallery. And two years later, in 1928, a book followed. It was called Unformen der Kunst (Archetypes of Art), composed of 120 photos and turned out a bestseller. The book was highly praised both by the art critics and the public and still is considered as one of the most influential books of photography ever.

But who was that artist who all of a sudden amazed the world with his unique vision?

Karl Blossfeldt

Karl Blossfeldt

 

His name is Karl Blossfeldt, a German teacher of art and a self-thought photographer, who that time was going into his 60s. Of course, he did not become a famous overnight but a long professional experience stood behind him. And here is the story …

Karl Blossfeldt was born on the 13th of June 1865, in Schielo, Harz Mountains, in central Germany. In 1881, at the age of 16, until 1884, he was sent as an apprentice to Magdesprung to study the craft in the local ironworks and foundry. Afterwards, until 1890, he studied art at the Kunstgewerbeschule (school of arts and crafts) in Berlin.

And it is from 1890 when his perception about his artistic expression started to form.

That year Blossfeldt was hired by Professor Moritz Meurer (1839-1916) to assist him in assembling a collection of botanical illustrations to be used as teaching materials in guiding the designers in their production of innovative motifs.

Professor Moritz Meurer was a recognized botanist and a decorative artist. His concept was that only through the study of the forms of nature, particularly of the plants, the artist can acquire the understanding of the design. In 1889 the Prussian Board of Trade assigned him a project about the improvement of the technical drawings in the state schools. Because the visual images were an integral part of documenting the diversity of plants, Meurer employed nine different artists to assist him in the production of the illustrations. They travelled within Germany and also to Italy and Greece collecting specimens. One of them was Karl Blossfeldt who photographed the local plants with a camera he had built himself. These photographs were published later in Meurer’s books and were used by the latter for the drawing classes he taught in Rome.

Karl Blossfeldt

Karl Blossfeldt

 

In 1898 Blossfeldt was offered a teaching post as an assistant professor of drawing and modeling at the very same Kunstgewerbeschule in Berlin he had graduated. Highly influenced by the Meurer’s vision, Blossfeldt continued to employ it until his retirement in 1930. For all those years he created an impressive archive of plant photographs. These images were made as nothing more than a teaching tool for educating his students about the design elements that could be found in the nature.

On the 9th of December, 1932, Karl Blossfeldt passed away.

Karl Blossfeldt

Karl Blossfeldt

 

to be continued

 

Tod McLellan – Things Come Apart

Todd McLellan‘s series ‘Things come apart‘ presents dismantled products from our daily life in motion as air-explosion and in stillness, meticulously arranged revealing a great sense of design.  All the particles are neatly organized not omitting even the smallest ones like nuts and bolts, showing the beauty of the product from another perspective.

All these ordinarily products like typewriter, wall clock, telephone, camera, iPod, printer, and so many others, are not only portraits of our technology time, but also showing that there is a whole hidden world of functioning most of us have no idea about it. We have learned how to use and serve with the tools and usually not interested in delving into the deeper layers of how exactly they were made. A reminder not to take for granted the world we have created.

Todd McLellan - Things Come Apart

Todd McLellan – Things Come Apart

 

The series is available as a photobook published by Thames & Hudson and to learn about the working process watch this short video

 

Abelardo Morell – ‘Camera Obscura’

Renowned photographer Abelardo Morell was born in 1948 in Cuba but since 1962 he resides in the USA. His first experiments with the camera obscura technique started in 1988 as a teacher of photography in art college when he covered the windows in the classroom with black opaque plastic sheeting in order to darken the place and no light be visible. Then he cut a small hole in them and his students were mesmerized with the result. On the opposite wall was projected the upside-down image of the scene from the outside. Simple but so powerful. And as he says “It felt like the moment photography was invented.”

Abelardo Morell -Camera Obscura

Abelardo Morell -Camera Obscura

 

An article in National Geographic explains what the Camera Obscure is and how Abelardo Morell applies its principles to his works and if you want to take a closer look of the process see the episode 1 of the BBC series The Genius of Photography  (from the 3th to the 6th minute )

 

Elliott Erwitt – the “amateur” photographer of the absurd moments

Elliot Erwitt

Elliot Erwitt

 

Elliott Erwitt‘s eyes catch immediately the quirky sense of humor in ironic situations that occurred in our everyday life. The ludicrous moments often we are not being able even to recognize, he shows them to us and makes us laugh.

Elliott Erwitt was born in 1928 in Paris but since the mid 40s he resides in New York. In 1953 he joined Magnum Photos following an invitation from Robert Capa.

Why Mr Erwitt’s works are so wildly appreciated? Probably because as he describes himself he is still and will remain always “an amateur photographer”, clarifying though that the word “amateur” means “to love”.

 

Elliot Erwitt

Elliot Erwitt

 

David Maisel – ‘The Lake Project’

David Maisel‘s aerial series ‘The Lake Project‘ – the surreal beauty of a ‘lake’s autopsy’ as a result of human intervention.

David Maisel - The Lake Project

David Maisel – The Lake Project

 

Owens Lake in California was once a 200 square-mile lake in a fertile valley. Drained for the water needs of Southern California in 1913, when the Owens River was diverted into the Owens Valley Aqueduct, now it is transformed into an arid landscape.

“For decades, fierce winds have dislodged microscopic particles from the lakebed, creating carcinogenic dust storms. Indeed, the site has become the highest source of particulate matter pollution in the United States, emitting 300,000 tons annually of cadmium, chromium, arsenic and other materials. The concentration of minerals in the remaining water yields blooms of microscopic bacteria, turning the liquid a deep, bloody red.”

From an eye bird view, however, it looks quite fascinating. David Maisel captured abstract scenes of color and texture bearing a resemblance “to river of blood, a microchip, a bisected vein, or a galaxy’s map – a strange beauty born of environmental degradation”, as he described it.

The project was mainly made 2001-2002 and is available as a photo book.