photography

Eric Pillot – ‘In Situ’

Eric Pillot‘s series ‘In Situ‘ – a metaphor of the ‘Other’.

“The Other, that I have tried to represent with nobility and a certain closeness, an ‘Other’ that lives more and more in “urban jungles”, an ‘Other’ that I have watched, but who in return watches me as well. who lives in “urban jungles”.

Eric Pillot - In Situ

Eric Pillot – In Situ

 

“Animals fascinate me as singular and beautiful beings, which we have to take care of. For several years, I have been photographing them and through my photography, I try to portray them in their beauty, and, in a way, to get closer to them”

 The series is published in two photobooks -‘In Situ‘ (2012) and ‘In Situ 2‘ (2015)

Sebastiaan Bremer

Sebastiaan Bremer‘s hand painted dot patterns create an explosion of colours and breathe a new life into these perfectly composed, meticulously painted and coloured flowers. Using already existing photographs and prints from a 1948 book called “Bloemen” (Flowers), he calls for a new perception of the process of ‘re-thinking’ a visual document .

photography, Sebastiaan Bremer, flowers, colours, dots, mixed media, fine art, inspiration

Sebastiaan Bremer

 

JeeYoung Lee – into a world of fantasy and fairy tales

JeeYoung Lee is a young artist from Korea, born 1983. Her studio is just 3x6m in the center of Seoul, but enough to create her amazing hand-crafted works. Literally. Everything in her art is handcrafted. With extraordinary patience for weeks, sometimes months, she creates the fabric of a universe born from her mind, then puts herself in this theatrical performance and clicks the shutter.  That’s it. Hard work, fantasy and no photoshop. Her art  is described as a fusion of installations, pop art, surreal landscapes and photography.

JeeYoung Lee

JeeYoung Lee

 

You can view more of her works on the site of the French gallery that represents her – Opiom Gallery and watch the work in process in this short video.

Josef Hoflehner – Jet Airliner

Josef Hoflehner’s Jet Airliner series comprises of high key photographs of low-flying planes over the heads of sunbathers at Maho Beach on the Dutch/French island of St. Maarten / St. Martin in the Caribbean Sea.  The beach is directly adjacent to the relatively short runway of the airport, therefore passenger jets roar as low as four meters above the holiday-makers.

The photographs were taken over a period  between early 2009 and late 2011 and 86 of them are published in the book ” Jet Airliner: The Complete Works

Josef Hoflehner - Jet Airliner

Josef Hoflehner – Jet Airliner

 

Toni Catany – the Spanish “poet of photography”

These words are not mine. Searching for information about Toni Catany, I found this article here and its author, Manuel Forcano, couldn’t say it better – “Treated with a very particular sensibility and highly personal aesthetics, the bodies or objects that become the protagonists of his photographs are truly like the words of a poem: essential, revealing, indispensable, deep and echoing…”

The mere facts about the life of Toni Catany are that he was born in 1942 in Mallorca and died 2013 in Barcelona. He was a self-thought photographer with a wanderlust  and a great passion about Mediterranean.

No official web site or social media, but he has published a lot of books with his works that could be found in the bookstores worldwide.

 

The Botanical Anthology of KARL BLOSSFELDT (1865-1932) – part 1

Imagine you are an art dealer and as you are viewing a student exhibition, suddenly you face to these photographs…

‘Captivating, outstanding, breathtaking!’ That was probably what Karl Nierendorf, an art dealer and owner of a gallery in Berlin, thought that moment almost a century ago, in 1926. He was so impressed by what he saw, that immediately arranged with the artist who had created them, an exhibition at his own gallery. And two years later, in 1928, a book followed. It was called Unformen der Kunst (Archetypes of Art), composed of 120 photos and turned out a bestseller. The book was highly praised both by the art critics and the public and still is considered as one of the most influential books of photography ever.

But who was that artist who all of a sudden amazed the world with his unique vision?

His name is Karl Blossfeldt, a German teacher of art and a self-thought photographer, who that time was going into his 60s. Of course, he did not become a famous overnight but a long professional experience stood behind him. And here is the story …

Karl Blossfeldt was born on the 13th of June 1865, in Schielo, Harz Mountains, in central Germany. In 1881, at the age of 16, until 1884, he was sent as an apprentice to Magdesprung to study the craft in the local ironworks and foundry. Afterwards, until 1890, he studied art at the Kunstgewerbeschule (school of arts and crafts) in Berlin.

And it is from 1890 when his perception about his artistic expression started to form.

That year Blossfeldt was hired by Professor Moritz Meurer (1839-1916) to assist him in assembling a collection of botanical illustrations to be used as teaching materials in guiding the designers in their production of innovative motifs.

Professor Moritz Meurer was a recognized botanist and a decorative artist. His concept was that only through the study of the forms of nature, particularly of the plants, the artist can acquire the understanding of the design. In 1889 the Prussian Board of Trade assigned him a project about the improvement of the technical drawings in the state schools. Because the visual images were an integral part of documenting the diversity of plants, Meurer employed nine different artists to assist him in the production of the illustrations. They travelled within Germany and also to Italy and Greece collecting specimens. One of them was Karl Blossfeldt who photographed the local plants with a camera he had built himself. These photographs were published later in Meurer’s books and were used by the latter for the drawing classes he taught in Rome.

In 1898 Blossfeldt was offered a teaching post as an assistant professor of drawing and modeling at the very same Kunstgewerbeschule in Berlin he had graduated. Highly influenced by the Meurer’s vision, Blossfeldt continued to employ it until his retirement in 1930. For all those years he created an impressive archive of plant photographs. These images were made as nothing more than a teaching tool for educating his students about the design elements that could be found in the nature.

On the 9th of December, 1932, Karl Blossfeldt passed away.

to be continued