Eric Pillot – ‘In Situ’

Eric Pillot‘s series ‘In Situ‘ – a metaphor of the ‘Other’.

“The Other, that I have tried to represent with nobility and a certain closeness, an ‘Other’ that lives more and more in “urban jungles”, an ‘Other’ that I have watched, but who in return watches me as well. who lives in “urban jungles”.

Eric Pillot - In Situ

Eric Pillot – In Situ

 

“Animals fascinate me as singular and beautiful beings, which we have to take care of. For several years, I have been photographing them and through my photography, I try to portray them in their beauty, and, in a way, to get closer to them”

 The series is published in two photobooks -‘In Situ‘ (2012) and ‘In Situ 2‘ (2015)

Paulette Tavormina – ‘Natura Morta’

Paulette Tavormina’s series ‘Natura Morta’ – a beautiful response in photographic form to the Old Dutch, Spanish, and Italian Masters of the 17th century – Giovanna Garzoni, Francesco de Zurbarán and Adriaen Coorte – as intensely personal interpretations of their timeless, universal stories.

“I have always been attracted to the magic of objects that evoke memories. Being a sentimental person, capturing moments in photography brings me back to past feelings so I can savor them again.”

Paulette Tavormina - Natura Morta

Paulette Tavormina – Natura Morta

 

“My photographs tell stories. The “Figs” express the Sicilian family history. I can imagine they are from my brother’s tree that was a graft from my father’s tree and in turn a graft of my grandfather’s tree. Snails on the branches are from my cousin’s villa in Palermo, next to the abandoned Giuseppe Lampedusa’s villa (author of Il Gattopardo, The Leopard). Lampedusa died in 1957. Snails at his villa look the same as snails at my cousin’s villa.”

Available as a photo book.

 

Sebastiaan Bremer

Sebastiaan Bremer‘s hand painted dot patterns create an explosion of colours and breathe a new life into these perfectly composed, meticulously painted and coloured flowers. Using already existing photographs and prints from a 1948 book called “Bloemen” (Flowers), he calls for a new perception of the process of ‘re-thinking’ a visual document .

photography, Sebastiaan Bremer, flowers, colours, dots, mixed media, fine art, inspiration

Sebastiaan Bremer

 

JeeYoung Lee – into a world of fantasy and fairy tales

JeeYoung Lee is a young artist from Korea, born 1983. Her studio is just 3x6m in the center of Seoul, but enough to create her amazing hand-crafted works. Literally. Everything in her art is handcrafted. With extraordinary patience for weeks, sometimes months, she creates the fabric of a universe born from her mind, then puts herself in this theatrical performance and clicks the shutter.  That’s it. Hard work, fantasy and no photoshop. Her art  is described as a fusion of installations, pop art, surreal landscapes and photography.

JeeYoung Lee

JeeYoung Lee

 

You can view more of her works on the site of the French gallery that represents her – Opiom Gallery and watch the work in process in this short video.

 

Philippe Halsman – ‘Jumps’

Philippe Halsman‘s series ‘Jumps‘ – “Starting in the early 1950s I asked every famous or important person I photographed to jump for me. I was motivated by a genuine curiosity. After all, life has taught us to control and disguise our facial expressions, but it has not taught us to control our jumps. I wanted to see famous people reveal in a jump their ambition or their lack of it, their self-importance or their insecurity, and many other traits.”

Philippe Halsman - Jumps

Philippe Halsman – Jumps

 

Eugene de Salignac (1861–1943) – the municipal photographer who captured the transformation of New York

Eugene de Salignac was employed as the single official photographer by the New York City Department of Bridges/ Plants & Structures* from 1906 to 1934. During that period using a large-format camera he captured the transformation of New York from a town to a city. Shooting mainly its changing architecture, growing infrastructure and those who built it, he left quite an impressive archive of 12,500 8″ x 10″ gelatin-silver and cyanotype prints and 20,000 8″ x 10″ glass plate and acetate negatives. Not only his prolific work but also his unique vision worth a few words about him. As Michael Lorenzini mentioned ‘A lot of other photographers who worked for the city were pretty talented but did not produce such a large body of work or a distinct body of work.’

Mr. Lorenzini, the senior photographer for the New York City Municipal Archives, is actually the man who rediscovered the talent of Eugene de Salignac in 1999. He explains that as he was spooling through microfilm of the city’s vast Department of Bridges photography collection, he realized that many of the images shared a common sophisticated aesthetic. Besides, he noticed that there were consecutive numbers scratched into the negatives. And then he realized that they had all been shot by a single unknown photographer. But who was he?

Trying to find the answer, Mr Lorenzini started a research. It took him many months and uncounted hours of trolling through archives storerooms, the Social Security index, Census reports and city records on births, deaths and employment, and finally discovered the photographer: Eugene de Salignac.

Though Michael Lorenzini unearthed primary sources to reconstruct de Salignac’s biography, still a lot about him remains unknown.

The basic facts of his life are that he was born in Boston in 1861 into an eccentric family of exiled French nobility. He got married, had two children and, after separating from his wife in 1903, at the age of 42 he started working for the City of New York. It was his brother-in-law who found him the job as an assistant to the photographer for the Department of Bridges, Joseph Palmer. After 3 years of apprenticeship, Palmer suddenly died, and in October 1906, de Salignac assumed his duties until 1934. Though he turned 70, he was still climbing bridges and actively working, but was forced to retire in 1934 despite a petition to Mayor La Guardia. Eugene de Salignac died in 1943, at 82.

De Salignac was not a typical municipal photograph. His job was to provide a record of the changing New York: the construction of bridges, municipal building, subway, tunnels, trolley lines, buses, ferries, street scenes, construction laborers, office workers, panoramas and etc. And he did it, but more as an artist than as an ordinary municipal worker. Some of his most compelling images reveal that he had an eye for composition, form and light. A real piece of art is his iconic photograph of the Brooklyn Bridge painters.

Obviously with such a huge amount, it is not possible that all of his photographs possess the high quality of an art work, but still they are great images from historical point of view. Moreover, it seems that de Salignac liked his job and these newly-built constructions became a continual source of his inspiration. He captured these symbols of the industrial progress in their unusual beauty.

Now since his name has emerged, he deserves all the merits for his work. In his lifetime de Salignac’s work was little seen outside of New York City government, and his name was forgotten after his death in 1943. Not however his images. They have been used in books and films but since their author was unknown, it was no possible to give them the correct credit.

Most of his collection now is held by the New York City Municipal Archives.

In 2007, they have published (publisher Aperture) the monograph ‘New York Rises: Photographs by Eugene de Salignac’ with authors Michael Lorenzini and Kevin Moore.

Among many of his photographic duties was also the task of taking portraits for licenses. He often shot two men at a time but it is not yet clear why.

*Bridges/Plant & Structures, 1901-1939. With consolidation of the Greater City of New York in 1898, all bridges over waterways were placed under jurisdiction of the newly-formed Department of Bridges. In 1916, Bridges merged with Public Works and became the Department of Plant & Structures with responsibility for streetcar lines, ferryboats, sewers, waste disposal facilities, homeless shelters, and bridges.

Fan Ho – the unique eye at Hong Kong during the 1950’s and 1960’s

“At the beginning you must find the ideal location. Then you must be patient to find the right subject that arouses your interest, even if it’s just a cat . You must have the precise moment to catch the spirit, the essence, the soul of the person… If you don’t have the exact moment, you have to wait for the right feeling. It’s real creative work because you have to have the feeling inside.”

These words regarding his technique belong to the photographer Fan Ho and his works undoubtedly confirm them.

Fan Ho, Hong Kong, photography, art, fine art photography, photo books, photography books, black and white photography

Fan Ho

 

Fan Ho was born in Shanghai in 1937, but in 1949 his family immigrated to Hong Kong and that was the place where he started to discover the magic of the painting with light. Still in his youth, with his father’s Rolleiflex camera in hand, he began to explore the everyday life of the crowded metropolis and archive it with the help of the lenses. However, his goal was not just to document the bustle of the urban life. Like an invisible observer, he was looking out to capture the solitary moments we have with ourselves to unveil the beauty of the internal world. And by carefully mastering of the light, he succeeded to present the drama of the daily routine but through a serene and peaceful atmosphere.

In 1980, Fan Ho moved to San Jose, California, and tried his skills also as a film director, and even acted in several movies, but it is his photography that assigns him a place among the greatest masters.

Due to health problems, nowadays he has devoted his professional time mostly organizing his rich heritage and up to now he has published three books – ‘Hong Kong Yesterday’,’ The Living Theatre’ and ‘A Hong Kong Memoir

Fan Ho is represented by Modern Book Gallery.