Pierre Gonnord – ‘Portraits’

Pierre Gonnord‘s ‘Portraits (Retratos)‘ – inspired by the great masters of portrait genre of the 17th and 18th century, diving with a deep compassion into the soul of people from social groups disregarded by the society and depicting them with grace, respect and elegance to make us remember they are humans too.

“I choose my contemporaries in the anonymity of the big cities because their faces, under the skin, narrate unique, remarkable stories about our era. Sometimes hostile or distant, almost always fragile behind the opacity of their masks, they represent specific social realities and another concept of beauty. I also try to approach the unclassifiable, timeless individual, to suggest things that have been repeated over and over since time began.”

Pierre Gonnord, Portraits, photography

Pierre Gonnord – Portraits

 

More than 100 portraits made between 1999 and 2012 are collected in a new spectacular book published by ‘La fabrica” .

Pierre Gonnord is a French self-taught photographer who since 1988 resides in Madrid.

To learn more about the artist’s thoughts behind the series, watch his interview on the occasion of an exhibition in New York

 

Guido Mocafico – ‘Movement’

Guido Mocafico‘s series ‘Movement‘ – all the moments in our life are carefully connected, creating an exquisite piece of art.

“In a horological movement, I find poetry meeting technology. The poetry of time elapsing, the change of seasons, astronomical movements, and technology which enables up to eight hundred mechanical pieces inside such a small volume, all working perfectly together, to reach the most accurate time calculation. Each one of these movements takes on a life of its own.”

Guido Mocafico, Movement, photography

Guido Mocafico – Movement

 

Some of the artist’s works are available as photo books, published by Steidl Verlag

 

Yang Fudong – ‘Ye Jiang (The Nightman Cometh)’

Yang Fudong‘s series ‘Ye Jiang (The Nightman Cometh) – an ancient warrior is wounded after a battle and he is now in conflict whether to die or continue fighting. Three ghosts appear as symbols of his feelings and thoughts that clash within his heart and mind as he has to decide…

The story unfolds in ‘neo-realistic’ narrative – the warrior in his traditional costume and the ghost in a modern dress. Neo-realism is described by the artist as “a history theatre where current and contemporary societal conditions come to play”.

So, the question is – how to continue our lives? What do we really want?

Yang Fudong, photography, Ye Jiang, The Nightman Cometh

Yang Fudong – Ye Jiang, The Nightman Cometh

 

Woong Soak Teng – ‘Ways to Tie Trees’

Woong Soak Teng‘s series ‘Ways to Tie Trees‘ – featuring with an abstract elegance a diversity of approaches to the art of tree-tying in exploring the manipulation of nature by humans in an attempt to construct productive and aesthetic living environments for ourselves.

“There are many creative permutations in the field of tree-tying. This is a crucial component in beautifying our garden city. To prevent organic growth, trees are uprooted and erected in organised intervals as green verges along roads or in open spaces. To ensure that trees flourish in the right direction, man-made objects are used as reinforcement. To ensure that public spaces are safe and conducive, trees have to be stabilised through the process of tree staking. With such structures in place, we co-exist with Mother Nature harmoniously and enjoy the benefits that she brings to our body, heart and mind.”

A book published by Steidl is coming in November, 2017

Woong Soak Teng, photography, Ways to Tie Trees

Woong Soak Teng – Ways to Tie Trees

 

Karine Laval – ‘Heterotopia’

Karine Laval‘s series ‘Heterotopia‘ – a beautiful luminous distorted alternate universe.

Heterotopia is described by French philosopher Michel Foucault as a space neither utopia nor dystopia but rather, a space of duality and contradiction.

Mastering light and colour by placing mirrors and sheets of glass between the leaves, branches, flowers and bushes in front of her camera, photographer Karine Laval (French, who lives in New York) creates her layered manipulated reality and turns Long Island gardens into a vivid and exotic netherland.

Karine Laval - Heterotopia

Karine Laval – Heterotopia

 

Mat Hennek – ‘Woodlands’

Mat Hennek‘s series ‘Woodlands‘ – special spaces of silence.

‘In Woodlands Mat Hennek presents genuine portraits of trees, the results of numerous hikes through various forests in Europe and the USA… He removes spatial landmarks, alternately erasing the ground and horizon to unhinge any sense of direction. Light and shadow, pattern and structure build up to an impressionistic hymn—infinite, without a center, without beginning or end.’

Mat Hennek - Woodland

Mat Hennek – Woodland

 

Available as a photo book published by Steidl.

Watch also this interview with the artist to learn more about the idea behind the project

 

Colonel Mervyn O’Gorman – ‘Christina in red’

Colonel Mervyn O’Gorman‘s series ‘Christina in red‘ – serene, almost surreal reality.

Mervyn O’Gorman was not a photographer. He was an electrical engineer and worked for cabling companies but devoted his free time to his hobby – the photography. And he made great images – red colour, narrow depth of field, long exposure, subdued natural tones of the background…

These images from a series ‘Christina’ were made in 1913 and for about a century the identity of the girl remained unknown. It was supposed she was his daughter but turned out that she was a daughter of a close friend. Her name was really Christina Elizabeth Frances Bevan, born in Harrow, London, on 8 March, 1897 and died in 1981.

Colonel Mervyn O'Gorman, Christina, photography, autochrome

Colonel Mervyn O’Gorman – Christina.

 

Helen van Meene

Helen van Meene‘s Vermeer-like portraits of teenage girls and their dogs.

Dutch photographer was inspired by a studio portrait of a dog from the 1920s, she found in 2010, and realized that “Back then, people only made one photo each year in their best dress… for some people, dogs are one of the family.”

Helen van Meene

Helen van Meene