Inge Morath – ‘On Style’

Inge Morath (1923–2002) new book ‘On Style‘.

Famous Austrian photographer “may have frequently photographed well-dressed people and many figures of the fashion world, but to call her a fashion photographer would be a mistake”, according to John P. Jacob, the McEvoy Family curator for photography at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. “Whether photographing festivals or artists’ studios, on films sets, the street, or the fashion runway, what distinguishes Morath’s photography is an unerring eye for life’s brilliant theatricality”

Inge Morath, photobook On Style, photography

Inge Morath – On Style

 

Suzanne Moxhay – ‘Interiors’

Suzanne Moxhay‘s latest series “interiors” – exploring concepts of spatial containment in montages built from fragments of photographed and painted interiors. By using different techniques like traditional cut, paste collage and digital manipulation, the British artist brings a theatrical sensibility to still images. The process is quite elaborate and she produces only 7-8 works per year.

View the whole gallery here and if you want to learn more about the process of making them click on the ‘About’ category and watch the video.

Suzanne Moxhay, photomontage, Interiors

Suzanne Moxhay – Interiors

 

Josephine Cardin – ‘Bailaora’

Josephine Cardin‘s series “Bailaora” captures the spirit of flamenco

“At the heart of all great art is an essential melancholy.” –  Federico García Lorca

Josephine Cardin, Bailaora, photography, flamenco, fine art photography, dancing, Spanish dances, inspiration

Josephine Cardin – Bailaora

 

“I have been asked many times what it is that “look for” when I look through my lens. I do not look for  something, rather I look at  something, someone, some place or event, and attempt to capture the essence, the emotion and the soul of the subject, whether a person or a building.

There is so much beauty in our everyday and by ‘beauty’ I do not speak of conventional beauty, but actually, harmony, truthfulness, and that which is telling. The beauty most of us miss because we are looking down, too busy, or simply too clouded in our minds by preconceptions to see the inspiration and real beauty of our everyday world.”

 

Tomoya Matsuura – ‘Withered Plants’

’s project ‘Withered Plants‘ – photo series featuring Nature with Its cycle of life, in the microscopic world

“Although all life comes to an end, the end is at the same time a beginning of the transition into something new. Small plants that exist by our side and we hardly take notice of also contain within themselves the majestic nature, and revolve their life force just the same. They are filled with a variety of expressions and dynamism that cannot be seen with the naked eye, and allow you to sense the mystery of the formation of life.” 

Tomoya Matsuura, Withered Plants, photography, black and white photography, flowers, art, inspiration

Tomoya Matsuura – Withered Plants

 

Shemara – ‘Marine Life’

In her personal beautiful project of children’s still life portraits called ‘Marine Life‘, Dutch photographer Shemara has caught a whole array of their honest expressions, pose and gestures leaving no question what they think about the sea creatures. As she has mentioned on her site “You cannot force them and you have to catch the moment that they give you”. The series was created in 2014 when her son was 5 years old and all the children are his friends at the same age. Shemara explained that she had let them to choose on their own what to hold in their hands and then photographed them with their choice.

Shemara, photography series Marine Life, children photography, portraits

Shemara – Marine Life

 

Mario Arroyave – ‘Timeline’

Mario Arroyave‘s series ‘Timeline‘ – a vision of alternative reality through visual repetition of water sports as a metaphor for time and space.

Inspired by the photographic motion studies of Eadweard Muybridge’s, Arroyave also captured images at controlled intervals of time. However, whilst Muybridge intention was to create the illusion of movement by reproducing them one after the other, Arroyave synthesizes them in a fixed space within a static image.

Mario Arroyave - Timeline

Mario Arroyave – Timeline

 

While shooting a television commercial in an aquatic complex, he noticed the water’s visually rich texture. “The effect of this over the skin of the players was so majestic that I decided to continue photographing water sports. Because there’s a lot of movement, the players are the focus of the game. Even taking a picture every 10 seconds, what you see in each image is completely different.”

Using Photoshop after capturing a significant amount of images, he starts to incorporate from 20 to 400 of them to achieve the final image; a procedure that usually takes him from 15 days to 3 months.