uncategorized art

Charles Petillon – ‘Invasions’

In his series ‘Invasions‘ French photographer Charles Pétillon uses balloons to materialize his ideas of unseen, unsaid, missed, forgotten in a poetic way. He builds in situ installations made of white balloons in places all around the world ranging from Calais and Dover beaches to the streets of Shanghai or to the black slopes of Mount Etna in Sicily. He creates a unique relationship between the ephemeral aspect of the installation and the photograph, which is the only testimony of something that does not exist anymore.
 
Charles Petillon, photography series Invasions

Charles Petillon – Invasions

 

Giovedì Poster – word 13 “Sardine”

I found this interesting project started by a group of Italian graphic designers in 2013 called Giovedì Poster. Each week they gathered and while listening music, chose a word on a random basis like for example ‘medal’, ‘roses’, ‘?????’, ‘storm’, ‘basket’ and so on, and this became the week theme. The project was opened for all designers and everybody could submit his idea but sadly it seems that they no longer maintain it. Nevertheless, visit the site to explore their visions and enjoy their works.

The images above are selected from the week theme ‘word 13 – sardine’ but there are more on the site.

Anthony James – Alphabetica

Such a gorgeous alphabet logos by Anthony James. Fantastic work!

View all the letters – http://www.anthonyjamesart.com/portfolio_page/logos-and-icons/

Vincent Mahé – Le Corbusier & 750 Years in Paris

 

Paris-based illustrator Vincent Mahé was tasked by the French weekly Télérama to create a short illustrated story of the life of the great architect Le Corbusier as a part of the celebrations of the 50th anniversary of his death, and he has done a remarkable work. In four double pages spread, he has succeeded to capture the prolific career of one of the pioneers of the modern architecture spanning six decades (from his first professional start in 1904 until his death in 1965).

The artist obviously is fascinated by the architecture and it shows from his next work called ‘750 years in Paris’, which was just published in a book. As he describes this project, it is “a literary graphic novel unlike anything else on the racks, 750 Years tells the story of our time, focusing on one single building in France as it sees its way through the upheavals of history. Beginning in the 13th century and making its way towards today… Generations have lived here before us, they’ve walked on this very same pavement, they’ve been under that same sky… If you could stand still for 750 years, what could you learn about the world?” The book is currently available to purchase through Nobrow Press

View Vincent Mahé’s portfolio at https://www.behance.net/vincentmahe  and follow him on Facebook and Instagram

Janet Echelman – aerial installations

You never know where exactly the creativity is hiding inside you.

The American artist Janet Echelman is just such an example. Nowadays she is famous with her beautiful, aerial, fluidly moving sculptures and installations that give new essence of urban spaces. But it took her about 10 years to find her artistic voice and everything started in 1997 with lost paints…

Born in 1965, after graduating college, she moved to Hong Kong in 1987 to study Chinese calligraphy and brush-painting. Followed a stay in Bali, then a return to the United States, and then again – back to Asia, embarking on a Fulbright lectureship in India. There was also an arrangement with Fulbright that she had to give exhibitions around the country, but not everything went according to the plan. When she shipped her paints to the fisher village Mahabalipuram, they never arrived. The deadline for the show approached, so she had to think up something quickly … And she found it – no painting but a sculpture. Though she has never studied sculpture, engineering or architecture, she decided to create a big, volumetric sculpture and yet gently floating in the air.

However what material to use for this purpose? Bronze casting was too heavy and expensive for making large forms. One day, walking on the beach, she saw fishermen bundling their nets into mounds on the sand and suddenly realized the potential of such a material. And that’s how her first sculpture was made. It’s a self-portrait titled “Wide Hips”, created with the help of the local fishermen. It was hoisted on poles and she was so mesmerized by the beauty and delicacy of the changing patterns that decided to give a try to another one.

Since then, 18 years later, from ‘simple’ sculptures, her works have grown to huge installations woven in big cities all over the world combining a high-end technology with art. Echelman collaborates with aeronautical, mechanical and software engineers, architects, lighting designers, landscape architects and fabricators. The fishnet, she used for her first work, merged to more complex materials like atomized water particles or Spectra fiber.

Her goal is not just to create an object to look at to but also to get lost in it and as she said in her TED talk ‘Taking Imagination Seriously’: “My artistic horizons continue to grow”.

Visit the official site to see all artist’s works with a detailed explanations about their construction, location on the map and video of the set up – http://www.echelman.com/

Hans Op de Beeck – Staging Silence (2)

Hans Op de Beeck - Staging Silence

Hans Op de Beeck is a multi-disciplinary artist from Belgium. His film ‘Staging Silence (2)’ is an amazing journey through many public places the artist has experienced. As he explains In his site  it is “based around abstract, archetypal settings that lingered in (his) memory  … memory images are disproportionate mixtures of concrete information and fantasies, and in this film they materialize before the spectator’s eyes through anonymous tinkering and improvising hands. Arms and hands appear and disappear at random, manipulating banal objects, scale representations and artificial lighting into alienating yet recognizable locations. These places are no more or less than animated decors for possible stories, evocative visual propositions to the spectator”.

The film is beautifully accompanied by a music composed especially for it by Scanner (UK), who was inspired by the images in its creation.

Bordalo II – ‘Abandoned’

Artur Bordalo aka Bordalo II is a young urban artist from Portugal who creates exceptional 3-D mural sculptures using cans, tires, plastics, car bumpers and whatever waste he finds in the cities. All this trash is his medium in spreading socially oriented messages to provoke  our modern cultures, ruled by the consumerism. Trash, as he describes it, “is the fruit of excessive consumerism”. The current slogan of the ‘advanced’ world – buy, buy, buy, then use it one time and throw it – leads to unnecessary quantities of garbage, which has a huge impact on the environment. However, the consumerism has also a hidden side effect upon our souls, transforming us into selfish, careless and irresponsible creatures.

Bordalo II - Trash Animals

Bordalo II – Trash Animals

 

Especially concerned about the animal welfare, Bordalo II has chosen them as main objects in most of his works to depict the thoughtless human behavior. His latest project called ‘Abandoned’ (Trash Animals) aims to raise awareness to problems with pet treatment and abandonment. The issue expands to incredible size particularly during the summer months. Not being able to take the pets with them due to different obstacles, their owners prefer to get rid of the animals at the expense of their vacation.  “I can´t understand how someone can go on holiday at peace with himself when he abandoned a son”, says the artist and hopes that his works will shake up the owners and they will reconsider their actions  before to leave and discard like a waste their yesterday’s beloved cats and dogs.

 

Ferrolic – the 21st century art

Ferrolic by Zelf Koelman

Ferrolic by Zelf Koelman

What actually is this? I have a strange connection with science and most of the time we do not speak the same language. It is difficult to explain in details how this new gadget functions, but as far as I understood, it is based on the feature of a liquid called “ferrofluid”  to respond immediately to the presence of a magnetic field.  It was invented as a rocket fuel in 1963 by a NASA scientist, Steve Papell, and nowadays it is used in many other industries. So, here in the basin there is a ferrofluid and behind the scenes  electromagnets that influence the fluid’s shape and movement.

This project is a work of the artist, designer and engineer  Zelf Koelman. Watch the video and if you are grabbed by it, you could get your very own Ferrolic display for about 7-8.000 euro, connect it to the internet and enjoy the animations. And when you are bored with one animation via a web browser the software could be edited and thus you will have a new one.

If you interested to learn more, go to the official site of Ferrolic.