colour

Sandrine Hermand-Grisel – ‘Waterlilies’

Like Monet’s ‘Waterlilies‘ – a drop of love from a mother to her children by Sandrine Hermand-Grisel.
“Young swimmers playing in the cool blue water pools of the brief summer season… Reality and poetry, lights and colors blend in a water ballet.”

Sandrine Hermand-Grisel - 'Waterlilies'

Sandrine Hermand-Grisel – ‘Waterlilies’

JeeYoung Lee – into a world of fantasy and fairy tales

JeeYoung Lee is a young artist from Korea, born 1983. Her studio is just 3x6m in the center of Seoul, but enough to create her amazing hand-crafted works. Literally. Everything in her art is handcrafted. With extraordinary patience for weeks, sometimes months, she creates the fabric of a universe born from her mind, then puts herself in this theatrical performance and clicks the shutter.  That’s it. Hard work, fantasy and no photoshop. Her art  is described as a fusion of installations, pop art, surreal landscapes and photography.

You can view more of her works on the site of the French gallery that represents her – Opiom Gallery .

Stitch Design Co. for Haus Interior Candle Collection

Sully Sullivan – photographer,
Amy Pastre/Courtney Rowson/Brittany Zuerlein – designers

source Communication Arts

Amos Chapple – amazing photos with a drone

I always envied the birds for their view and when I saw in the UK Business Insider the amazing photos of the New Zealand photographer Amos Chapple, I was fascinated.

Here is the link to the article with 38 photos http://uk.businessinsider.com/illegal-drone-photos-of-the-most-beautiful-places-on-earth-2015-3?r=US

And of course, visit Amos Chapple’s official site http://www.amoschapplephoto.com/air/ and if you would like to see what actually means photography with a drone, click on the link for a short video of the photographer’s interview for BBC.

In brief, he explains that when the first commercial drone appeared in the market in 2013 he grabbed right away the opportunity to explore the world from a different angle. His drone is a Chinese Phantom which allows him to shoot from 400 feet (about 121 m) in the air, and takes 100 shots during a single flight. Of course, it doesn’t mean that all 100 shots would be great images. In fact only 10 to 20 of them will be framed in a pleasing way, because it shoots ‘on blind’ and Chapple is not aware of the final results. But as he says, “There’s a magic to not knowing what you have until you have the camera back in your hands”

Why he has chosen to photograph with a drone instead of hiring a helicopter? Besides that it is cheaper, Chapple has found also a huge advantage in drones – the ability to shoot in unusual weather.

However, since 2014 flying drones for commercial purposes was banned by the Federal Aviation Administration. Now in most of the places in the world it is illegal, but Chapple continues to explore these ones where this technology is still allowed. Eager to see them.

If interested in a eye-bird photos, check also David Maisel’s Lake Project http://thesweettasteoflife.com/david-maisel-the-lake-project/

Tod McLellan – Things Come Apart, in stillness & in motion

Todd McLellan’s idea of presenting dismantled products from our daily life deserves serious attention. First of all, because of the way the different parts of each item are photographed – in motion as air-explosion and in stillness, meticulously arranged as a gorgeous picture itself. The images of stillness reveals his great sense of design. They are really amazing. I couldn’t  wonder how he organized all the particles not omitting even the smallest ones like nuts and bolts, showing the beauty of the product from another perspective. However, all these ordinarily products like typewriter, wall clock, telephone, camera, iPod, printer, and so many others, are not only portraits of our technology time, but also show us that there is a whole hidden world of functioning most of us have no idea about it. We have learned how to use and serve with the tools and usually not interested in delving in the deeper layers of how exactly they were made, and thus this project is as well a nice reminder not to take for granted even the world we have created

Todd McLellan is a Canadian photographer. Check in amazon for his book Things Come Apart as well visit his official site, where is also a video of the working process

 Todd McLellan -  in stillness   Todd McLellan -  in motion   

 Todd McLellan -  in stillness - 2  Todd McLellan -  in motion - 2

 Todd McLellan -  in stillness - 3  Todd McLellan -  in motion - 3

 Todd McLellan -  in stillness - 4  Todd McLellan -  in motion - 4

 Todd McLellan -  in stillness - 5  Todd McLellan -  in motion - 5