B&W

Toni Catany – the Spanish “poet of photography”

These words are not mine. Searching for information about Toni Catany, I found this article here and its author, Manuel Forcano, couldn’t say it better – “Treated with a very particular sensibility and highly personal aesthetics, the bodies or objects that become the protagonists of his photographs are truly like the words of a poem: essential, revealing, indispensable, deep and echoing…”

The mere facts about the life of Toni Catany are that he was born in 1942 in Mallorca and died 2013 in Barcelona. He was a self-thought photographer with a wanderlust  and a great passion about Mediterranean.

No official web site or social media, but he has published a lot of books with his works that could be found in the bookstores worldwide.

 

The Botanical Anthology of KARL BLOSSFELDT (1865-1932) – part 2

The Botanical Anthology of KARL BLOSSFELDT The Botanical Anthology of KARL BLOSSFELDT, plants, photography,

What was so unique in the works of Blossfeldt?

Obviously he had adopted the Meurer’s conception and was inspired by the artistic structure and architectural elegance of the plants. He was intrigued with every component of the plant – flowers, buds, seed capsules, roots, tendrils, pods, twigs.

“The plant never lapses into mere arid functionalism; it fashions and shapes according to logic and suitability, and with its primeval force compels everything to attain the highest artistic form,” he said.

But reviewing the diverse art movements at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th the use of botanical motifs was not something innovative. Actually they were very popular, especially in the Art Nouveau designs.

The uniqueness is in the original way he captured them: magnification, sharp focus, balanced arrangement, neutral background, high contrast and diffused lightening with only slightest grey shadows beneath the objects.

With his homemade camera he could reach a magnification up to 30x times of the genuine size; an amplification common for what is called now macro photography. This along with the sharp focus reveal extraordinary details of a plant natural structure and shape and provides a visual access to its beauty and lucidity. The trend in photography that time was for elaborate backgrounds, but Blossfeldt’s compositions distinguished with centered plants against a plain monochromatic ground. The viewer should not have to be destructed in his investigation of the object. Showing the finest features of a plant in an isolated contest emphasize their inwardness and expose the individuality and the character of each of them.

The Botanical Anthology of KARL BLOSSFELDT, plants, photography The Botanical Anthology of KARL BLOSSFELDT, plants, B&W photography, design learning

After the success of his 1st book in 1928, Blossfeldt was persuaded by Nierendorf to collect another 120 of his photos and in 1932 was published his 2nd book – Wundergarten der Natur (Magic Garden of Nature), again making a phenomenal impact as the previous one and winning him a recognition as one of the key photographers of the 20th century.

              KARL BLOSSFELDT, URFORMEN DER KUNST, book cover KARL BLOSSFELDT, WUNDERGARTEN DER NATUR, book cover, plant, B&W photography

Returning to that student exhibition we started… Through the eyes of the past years what else we could add to ‘captivating, outstanding, breathtaking’ when describing the Blossfeldt’s works? Surely a lot, but only one stands out – ‘classical’. Though almost a century has been passed, these graphic black and white photos continue to excite and impress the public. They remain unique and at the same time modern as if they were created nowadays. And apart of their artistic value, they haven’t lost their main purpose and still could be used as teaching materials. Something that probably for Blossfeldt would be the greatest reward.

The Botanical Anthology of KARL BLOSSFELDT (1865-1932) – part 1

Imagine you are an art dealer and as you are viewing a student exhibition, suddenly you face to these photographs…

‘Captivating, outstanding, breathtaking!’ That was probably what Karl Nierendorf, an art dealer and owner of a gallery in Berlin, thought that moment almost a century ago, in 1926. He was so impressed by what he saw, that immediately arranged with the artist who had created them, an exhibition at his own gallery. And two years later, in 1928, a book followed. It was called Unformen der Kunst (Archetypes of Art), composed of 120 photos and turned out a bestseller. The book was highly praised both by the art critics and the public and still is considered as one of the most influential books of photography ever.

But who was that artist who all of a sudden amazed the world with his unique vision?

His name is Karl Blossfeldt, a German teacher of art and a self-thought photographer, who that time was going into his 60s. Of course, he did not become a famous overnight but a long professional experience stood behind him. And here is the story …

Karl Blossfeldt was born on the 13th of June 1865, in Schielo, Harz Mountains, in central Germany. In 1881, at the age of 16, until 1884, he was sent as an apprentice to Magdesprung to study the craft in the local ironworks and foundry. Afterwards, until 1890, he studied art at the Kunstgewerbeschule (school of arts and crafts) in Berlin.

And it is from 1890 when his perception about his artistic expression started to form.

That year Blossfeldt was hired by Professor Moritz Meurer (1839-1916) to assist him in assembling a collection of botanical illustrations to be used as teaching materials in guiding the designers in their production of innovative motifs.

Professor Moritz Meurer was a recognized botanist and a decorative artist. His concept was that only through the study of the forms of nature, particularly of the plants, the artist can acquire the understanding of the design. In 1889 the Prussian Board of Trade assigned him a project about the improvement of the technical drawings in the state schools. Because the visual images were an integral part of documenting the diversity of plants, Meurer employed nine different artists to assist him in the production of the illustrations. They travelled within Germany and also to Italy and Greece collecting specimens. One of them was Karl Blossfeldt who photographed the local plants with a camera he had built himself. These photographs were published later in Meurer’s books and were used by the latter for the drawing classes he taught in Rome.

In 1898 Blossfeldt was offered a teaching post as an assistant professor of drawing and modeling at the very same Kunstgewerbeschule in Berlin he had graduated. Highly influenced by the Meurer’s vision, Blossfeldt continued to employ it until his retirement in 1930. For all those years he created an impressive archive of plant photographs. These images were made as nothing more than a teaching tool for educating his students about the design elements that could be found in the nature.

On the 9th of December, 1932, Karl Blossfeldt passed away.

to be continued

Chris Raschka & Vladimir Radunsky – Alphabetabum

ALPHABETABUM? What does it mean? As the authors and illustrators of this newly published book, Chris RaschkaVladimir Radunsky explained, this is an ALPHABET book with an ALBUM of old photos.

And actually it is what they state –  a book of letters accompanied with vintage photos of children. Quite original way to help the kids in learning the alphabet. First, because the funny text below the letters describes the child associated with it in view of the pose, expression of the face or what wears or holds in the hands. Such an approach not only gives an individuality to each letter, but on the second place, makes the readers to fantasize stories about the depicted children. After all, with so many letters, we have a whole “neighborhood” full of children and finishing the book opens the door to an imaginary world where the kids could play with all those characters. And thirdly, unfortunately, this is probably their solely experience with such photos. With the new technologies only the professional photographers continue to care about the old-fashioned film, so they are already on their way of vanishing from our daily lives. Therefore, the book is not addressed only to the little ones, but it is a beautiful nostalgic look for their parents too.

Official site of Vladimir Radunsky – http://www.vladimirradunsky.com/

I couldn’t find an official site of Chris Raschka but here it is his twitter – https://twitter.com/chrisraschka

 

Elliott Erwitt – the “amateur” photographer of the absurd moments

Elliott Erwitt was born in 1928  in Paris but since the mid of 40s he resides in New York. His eyes catch immediately the quirky sense of humor in ironic situations within our everyday life. The ludicrous moments we often find ourselves into but not being able even to recognize them. And here it comes Mr. Erwit – to show us the absurd side of the coin and makes us laugh.

Since 1953 he is a member of Magnum Photos where was invited to join by its founder Robert Capa.

Why Mr Erwitt’s works are so wildly appreciated? Probably because as he describes himself he is still and will remain always “an amateur photographer”, clarifying though that the word “amateur” comes from the Latin and means “to love”.

Mr. Erwitt’s official web site – http://www.elliotterwitt.com/lang/index.html