B&W

Kikuji Kawada – ‘The Last Cosmology’

Kikuji Kawada‘s series ‘The Last Cosmology’ – deeply emotional imagery of mainly stars, eclipses, cloudscapes and other celestial phenomena as a chronicle of the dramas in the skies and symbols of life and death, and the fragile nature of our existence.

The photographs were captured between 1980 and 2000, feeling a sense of nostalgic void caused by two historical events on earth: the death of the Emperor Hirohito in 1989 and the Showa Era in Japan ending with him, and the end of 20th century.

Kikuji Kawada - The Last Cosmology

Kikuji Kawada – The Last Cosmology

 

“I was born at the beginning of the Showa Era. There was a great war during my boyhood and then I lived during the period of re-construction and growth and now I slowly approach the evening of life. Through these photographs the cosmology is an illusion of the firmament at the same time it includes the reality of an era and also the cosmology of a changing heart… I imagine the era and myself as an implicitly intermingling catastrophe… I want to spy on the depths of a multihued heart that is like a Karman vortex.”

Published in a photo book by Mack.

Keith Taylor – ‘Otherworld’

Keith Taylor’s series ‘Otherworld’ – the geography of our desire and curiosity.

From the dawn of its existence, mankind creates mythological homes for gods, and mythical other worlds of hope or doom. Because of our limited perception these places often share characteristics with our familiar earthly landscapes.

Keith Taylor - Otherworld

Keith Taylor – Otherworld

 

“The photographs of barren terrains were taken in the upper Midwest to render possible models of the Earth-like planets currently being sought by NASA’s Kepler mission, and it also references the mythologies of many cultures that establish a land that is home to spiritual beings or the dead… I am using photographs of real places to suggest realms that may or may not exist.”

 

Ross Faircloth – ‘Evidence of Chance’

Ross Faircloth’s series ‘Evidence of Chance’ – back to the conventional elements in photography, light, time, light-sensitive materials and photo-chemistry, and experimenting with the chance in search for a new way of seeing.

Ross Faircloth - Evidence of Chance

Ross Faircloth – Evidence of Chance

 

“This process began by turning traditional darkroom paper, the light sensitive material, into the camera itself.  It was then either covered in black cloth and taken outside to expose and create a recognizable image or left outside and unprotected for weeks to months at a time to expose not only to light but also the harsh Texas environment to incorporate the element of chance.  The paper cameras left to ‘chance’ were also manipulated through application of photo-chemistry, some before and some after their extended time exposing outside.  This allowed for another element of chance in the work through the use of abstract expressionism techniques.  The use of abstract expressionism creates an interesting conversation in relation to photography, as abstract expressionism is a visual recording, until now, in paint, of an action or event that is itself the content for the work of art.  Oddly enough, you could define photography in the same way.”

 

Pavlina Ecclesiarhou – ‘Epitaphs’

Pavlina Ecclesiarhou’s series of hand painted monochromatic photographs of animals ‘Epitaphs’ – stories between the lines about our collective responsibility as humans.

Inspired by the dioramas in Natural History museums and exploring the theme of what is reality and its subjective effect on a personal memory, the artist opens a dialogue about timelessness of nature and our share in it, and whose epitaph we actually discuss …

Pavlina Ecclesiarhou - Epitaphs

Pavlina Ecclesiarhou – Epitaphs

 

“I invite the viewer to stop, experience a moment of uncertainty, perceiving it as a photograph, or a painting, questioning perception and consciousness, and in doing this, re-considering the relationship of illusion to reality. I also invite the viewer to contemplate the silent stories of these animals and consider why they matter to us… An epitaph is the writing on a tombstone. It speaks of mourning. My photographs are both an ode to nature’s grandeur and a lament about our waning connection to it. One is left with both a sense of awe as well as grief, that a harmonious coexistence might be an illusion. Yet, the overriding feeling is that of the urgent responsibility we have to halt the disappearance of animal species and their worlds because they do matter.”

 

Michael Schnabel – ‘Stille Berge’ and ‘Weisses Land Skizzen’

Michael Schnabel’s sophisticated landscapes with quiet mountains, almost unrealistic and abstract, in his series ‘Stille Berge’ and ‘Weisses Land Skizzen’ – capturing the majestic silence of the Alps through mastering the lightest and the darkest verges of tranquility.

Unlikely the typical romantic Alpine Idyll, these panoramas of gigantic bodies can be sensed by contours, lines and shapes blended in such a harmonious way that you can feel the mountain more than you can see it. They are like graphic compositions of the infinite calmness and grandeur, drawn with the silk of the day and the velvet of the night.

Michael Schnabel - Stille Berge

Michael Schnabel – Stille Berge

 

“The night and its silence gives the mountains a sublimity, feeling of raw creation and aloofness that I strived to capture in my work.  Exposure times were about an hour; a sharp contrast to the city images which required only a few minutes. Focusing and even framing the image through the ground glass was another issue, as there was precious little to see under the low light conditions… Sometimes it was so dark, that I oriented myself only with the compass… Even at night there are colors in nature; they are important to me, even if they are very subtle.”

 

Michael Schnabel - Weisses Land Skizzen

Michael Schnabel – Weisses Land Skizzen

 

“In these raw virgin landscapes I found tranquility, not only at night, but also during the day. This allowed me to work during the day. These locations have a clarity and depth that one can feel. This body of work is a subjective image of these awe inspiring natural spaces where I am – once again – experimenting with the boundaries of photography as they relate to paintings or works on paper which is best noticeable in the original.”

 

Anup Shah – ‘The Mara’

Anup Shah’s series ‘The Mara’ – an intimate portrayal of the essence and wonder of the wild animals world and their fascinating life performance at the stage in Kenya’s Maasai Mara National Reserve.

Anup Shah - The Mara

Anup Shah – The Mara

 

“A few years ago, on the open plains of Maasai Mara, I was in the midst of elephants and within touching distance of a couple of them. I felt a primeval sense of being, a connection to a distant past. I wondered if I could translate that feeling into photographs. I opted for an approach that is immediate, intimate, immersive, inclusive and involving but which also gives a feeling of space. I wanted to impart to the viewer what it feels like – mentally and physically – to be inside the vast and lively landscape of Maasai Mara, being among wild animals…Then, perhaps, the viewer might connect with the Mara and extend sympathy to this natural world”

The images are collected in a photo book

 

Huntington Witherill – ‘Orchestrating Icons’

Huntington Witherill’s series ‘Orchestrating Icons’ – recording the rhythms in nature through observation of the light.

“As a photographer with a background in design, what I do is to try to intellectualize in my head what is it about what I’m looking at that causing me to take notice of it. It might be a gesture of line, some repetitive series of light and shadow that create some sort of a symmetrical condition. I’m trying to zero in on exactly what that is and eliminate everything else out of the frame, to simplify and to distill it.”

Huntington Witherill - Orchestrating Icons

Huntington Witherill – Orchestrating Icons

 

“I think Edward Weston referred to it as the flame of recognition where you are out in the world and you have this kind of connection with whatever it is that you are photographing that doesn’t happen all the time but it required that you kind of be out there looking all the time in order to catch those moments and it’s not just about a moment in time. It’s actually about a connection between your recognition of whatever it is you are looking at in the particular situation that is occurring at that very moment.

You have to open your mind and let the photographs find you.”

 

Robert Pufleb and Nadine Schlieper – ‘Alternative Moons’

Alternative Moon’ – a project by Robert Pufleb and Nadine Schlieper with 42 unique photographs of our beloved natural satellite offering “an unusual space trip to discover formerly unseen images”.

Robert Pufleb and Nadine Schlieper - Alternative Moons

Robert Pufleb and Nadine Schlieper – Alternative Moons

 

The images are unseen because actually they are not from the Moon, but a metaphor for how we perceive images. They are pancakes.

“Applying them to our moon, we are trying to create some kind of awareness towards interpreting and processing visual information… In the very beginning, the imagery of ‘Alternative Moons’ was a rather accidental discovery. It was one of those rare moments, when one is looking at an everyday object but sees something completely different…. like mysterious moons from an unknown galaxy”.

The photographs are collected in a book along with the recipes.

 

Flor Garduño – ‘Witnesses of Time’

Flor Garduño’s series ‘Witnesses of Time’ – capturing the spirituality of the Indian cosmos as a unique perception of time where past, present and future blend simultaneously, so that mankind feels the eternity of the universe.

Flor Garduño - Witnesses of Time

Flor Garduño – Witnesses of Time

 

The project was realized in the years 1983-1991, recording as witnesses to the secrets of time margins, landscapes, architecture, religious ceremonies and social events in ritual towns in Mexico, Guatemala, Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador, as well as portraits of ordinary people and their daily life rhythm and customs.

Central and South America are the places to which the artist’s soul is deeply connected emotionally and culturally, and by compressing the limited with infinite in a single image, she gives life to mystical archetypes and long established traditions as an integral part of the modern world.

The series is available as a photo book.