B&W

Milagros Caturla

Milagros Caturla – a rare Spanish photography talent discovered by chance

In 2001 while holidaying in Barcelona, American traveler Tom Sponheim bought for $3.50 at the local flee market Els Enchants an envelope with negatives from an unknown photographer. After the negatives were exposed few years later, amazing photographs from Barcelona’s life in the 1960s came to light. Fascinated by their quality Tom Sponheim decided to try to find their mystery author and in 2010 he created the Facebook page – ‘Las Fotos Perdidas de Barcelona’. Though many people identified themselves in the photos, still the identity of the original photographer remained unknown.
Until 2017 when Begoña Fernández thanks to hours of painstaking research in the archives eventually identified the photographer as Milagros Caturla. Actually, Milagros Caturla was not a professional photographer but a passionate amateur who used to ramble Barcelona streets in her free time catching the everyday life of her fellow- citizen. She was well known that time and had won many photo contests before her death in 2008.

So, will Milagros Caturla follow the destiny of Vivian Maier’s discovery? According to the words of Mr Sponheim the answer is no. “The images are not for sale. My main purpose is to make sure that these images are preserved for the people of Barcelona and for any of the families affected.”

Milagros Caturla, photography, Barcelona 1960s

Milagros Caturla

Cheryle St. Onge – “Natural Findings”

The series ‘Natural Findings‘ by Cheryle St. Onge “explore the curiosity and awe of our early grasp of nature; a paper wasp nest that appears dropped from Mars, the frog egg masse that on close inspect, possible through a photograph, becomes a gelatinous scoop of stars, a constellation of black dots, soon to be tadpoles. The photographs become both the shared means of a longer examination and the conduit of our own private recollection of nature.”

Cheryle St. Onge photography, series Natural Findings

Cheryle St. Onge – Natural Findings

Masahisa Fukase – “The solitude of ravens”

Japanese photographer Masahisa Fukase made his obscure masterpiece ‘Ravens’ (‘Karasu’) between 1975 and 1982 as a way of overcoming a personal emotional trauma following a divorce with his second wife Yōko Wanibe. Though the photographs at first sight are a personal lament reflecting the darkened vision of the photographer himself, they are regarded by many as the most important body of work to come out of postwar Japan, and still its imagery continues to inspire artists and writers today.

Masahisa Fukase, series Ravens, photography

Masahisa Fukase – Ravens

The project originated as an eight-part series for the magazine Camera Mainichi  and these photo essays reveal that Fukase experimented with multiple exposure printing and narrative text as part of the development of the Karasu concept. The first book was published in 1986, subsequent editions were published in 1991 and and 2008, and in May, 2017 a new one is coming.

“Ravens is one of the defining bodies of work in the history of photography and a high point in the photo book genre. This accumulation of accolades, and the passing of time, have obscured much of the fascinating detail which explains the artist’s pre-occupation with this motif throughout his work. It was not simply a reflection of the existential angst and anhedonia he suffered throughout his life but manifested in artistic self-identification with the raven and ultimately spiralled into a solitary existence and artistic practice on the edge of madness…” Tomo Kosuga from his essay Cries of Solitude [2017]

The video below was created by Esther ‘t Hart and Wiek Roggeveen as a tribute to the photographer.

Roger Eberhard – “Standard”

Roger Eberhard‘s conceptual project ‘Standard‘ – 32 cities, 32 identical hotel rooms = The Typology of  the World

Roger Eberhard, photobook- Standard

Roger Eberhard – Standard

 

Swiss photographer Roger Eberhard traveled around the globe to document how ‘standard’ this world has become. He took only 2 photos where he stayed – one from the interior of his Hilton ‘Standard’ hotel room and another from the view out of his window, always using the same perspective.

Besides of the uniformity of each room (there is even a manual for that called “Hilton Design and Construction Standards Manual”), Eberhard was surprised to find that there were similarities in the outside view too. Skyscrapers, broad avenues, highways – the usual modern city landscape gives as little clue to the location as the interior. “The result is a typology of rooms which are arranged according to the same formula all over the world,” Eberhard says. “But also the views tell of standardization, of the anonymity of the urban space.”

Eberhard states that the project is not a critic of globalization or questioning Hilton’s quality. It is just an observation of the new world. His conclusion is more about our ‘standard’ behaviour – “Why do we travel the world and stay in a place that looks same everywhere we go? What does that say about us as creatures of habit?”

The project is available in a photobook ‘ Roger Eberhard – Standard’