B&W

Masahisa Fukase – ‘The solitude of ravens’

Japanese photographer Masahisa Fukase made his obscure masterpiece ‘Ravens’ (‘Karasu’) between 1975 and 1982 as a way of overcoming a personal emotional trauma following a divorce with his second wife Yōko Wanibe. Though the photographs at first sight are a personal lament reflecting the darkened vision of the photographer himself, they are regarded by many as the most important body of work to come out of postwar Japan, and still its imagery continues to inspire artists and writers today.

Masahisa Fukase - Ravens

Masahisa Fukase – Ravens

 

The project originated as an eight-part series for the magazine Camera Mainichi  and these photo essays reveal that Fukase experimented with multiple exposure printing and narrative text as part of the development of the Karasu concept. The first book was published in 1986, subsequent editions were published in 1991 and and 2008, and in May, 2017 a new one published by Mack Books.

“Ravens is one of the defining bodies of work in the history of photography and a high point in the photo book genre. This accumulation of accolades, and the passing of time, have obscured much of the fascinating detail which explains the artist’s pre-occupation with this motif throughout his work. It was not simply a reflection of the existential angst and anhedonia he suffered throughout his life but manifested in artistic self-identification with the raven and ultimately spiralled into a solitary existence and artistic practice on the edge of madness…” Tomo Kosuga from his essay Cries of Solitude [2017]

 

Masahisa Fukase - Ravens

Masahisa Fukase – Ravens

 

 

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly – ‘For My Daughters’

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly’s series ‘For My Daughers‘ – a beautiful and thoughtful dialogue between mother and daughter, between words and images, between time and space.

When she was still a teenager, Dorothy Monnelly discovered in the attic of their home, a box of her mother’s poems. They were written between 1920 – 1945 and left as her “creative” legacy for her daughters.

The series consists of floral stills and landscape photographs and is published as a photobook “For My Daughters”.

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly - For My Daughters, Floral Stills

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly – For My Daughters, Floral Stills

 

“I have always treasured my mother’s poetry. When reading it recently, she gave me the idea of combining my images with her poetry to create a conversation back and forth about the idea expressed in each poem. She felt that we would understand each other, and writes in a poem to her daughters:

The pattern born within my mind

Is latent in their own. My wisdom

May not be profound, but they will recognize

Its likeness in their blood and bone.

It has been said that my photography shows the extraordinary in the ordinary; the same comment has been made regarding my mother’s poetry.”

 

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly - For My Daughters, Landscapes

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly – For My Daughters, Landscapes

 

 

Inge Morath – ‘On Style’

Inge Morath (1923–2002) new book ‘On Style‘.

Famous Austrian photographer “may have frequently photographed well-dressed people and many figures of the fashion world, but to call her a fashion photographer would be a mistake”, according to John P. Jacob, the McEvoy Family curator for photography at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. “Whether photographing festivals or artists’ studios, on films sets, the street, or the fashion runway, what distinguishes Morath’s photography is an unerring eye for life’s brilliant theatricality”

Inge Morath, photobook On Style, photography

Inge Morath – On Style

 

Tomoya Matsuura – ‘Withered Plants’

’s project ‘Withered Plants‘ – photo series featuring Nature with Its cycle of life, in the microscopic world

“Although all life comes to an end, the end is at the same time a beginning of the transition into something new. Small plants that exist by our side and we hardly take notice of also contain within themselves the majestic nature, and revolve their life force just the same. They are filled with a variety of expressions and dynamism that cannot be seen with the naked eye, and allow you to sense the mystery of the formation of life.” 

Tomoya Matsuura, Withered Plants, photography, black and white photography, flowers, art, inspiration

Tomoya Matsuura – Withered Plants

 

Thomas Subtil – ‘Hakuna Matata’

Thomas Subtil‘s “Hakuna Matata“ funny and surreal animal “photographic reality”

“Since I remember I always imagined extraordinary stories and adventures. Today things didn’t changed. I kept my kid mind and released it on my work…I think every body loves humour, in many different ways. Which one is yours? To me, is when there is very serious situation in a complet crazy world. When a elephant do very serious tightrope walk in a world where it can happen… so, please relax, take off your shoes, forgot your daily problem and escape in an another world.” 

Thomas Subtil - Hakuna Matata

Thomas Subtil – Hakuna Matata

 

 

Tommy Ingberg – ‘Reality Rearranged’

Tommy Ingberg‘s stories about human nature in surrealistic photo montages.

“This is a series of black and white, surrealistic photo montages. The pictures start off with a feeling, a story, a riddle for the viewer to think about. I strive for simple, scaled back compositions with few elements, where every part adds to the story, but where there are still gaps for the viewer to fill.”

Tommy Ingberg - Reality Rearranged

Tommy Ingberg – Reality Rearranged

 

“For me, surrealism is about trying to explain something abstract like a feeling or a thought, expressing the subconscious with a picture. The Reality Rearranged series is my first try at describing reality trough surrealism. During the five years I have worked on the series I have used my own inner life, thoughts and feelings as seeds to my pictures. In that sense the work is very personal, almost like a visual diary.
Despite this subjectiveness in the process I hope that the work can engage the viewer in her or his own terms. I want the viewers to produce their own questions and answers when looking at the pictures, my own interpretations are really irrelevant in this context.”