B&W

Michael Wolf – ‘Paris Tree Shadows’

Michael Wolf’s series ‘Paris Tree Shadows’ – the artist’s passion for collecting repeated patterns in contemporary megapolis inspired him to point his lens to the simple beauty of daily life in urban cities, created by shadows of tree brunches and trunks over Parisian buildings. Composed in the rhythm of noir style there is also a sense of a drama like in a classic mystery combined with the tenderness of poetry and a quiet admiration of the power of surviving nature.

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Michael Wolf – Paris Tree Shadows

 

 

Masahiro Kodaira – ‘Other things‘

Masahiro Kodaira’s series ‘Other things‘ – “Shooting is an intuition. I am trying to take what I do not understand yet. I always think about the biggest mystery. What is the most obvious thing?”

Inspired by Rudolf Otto’s 1917 book ‘Das Heilige’ (‘The Idea of the Holy’), the series is the artist’s visual response to the writer’s notion of the ‘numinous’ – “feeling outside of the self.”

“When you shoot without talking to anyone or when you are in a room looking over a window, you may suddenly experience unexpected fear. What is this world? That strong sense against the outside world that eyes are exposed defenseless without knowing why he or she is present. The same is with ecstasy.”

Masahiro Kodaira - Other things

Masahiro Kodaira – Other things

 

Source artist statement

Anna Reivilä – ‘Bond’

Anna Reivilä’s series ‘Bond’ –  ropes tied in beautiful lines around natural elements in a new way of creating a connection with and interpretation of the landscape, inspired by Japanese concept of ‘kinbaku-bi’.

Anna Reivilä – ‘Bond’

Anna Reivilä – ‘Bond’

 

“According to Japanese religious ceremonies, ropes and ties symbolize the connections among people and the divine, as a mean to identify sacred space and time.

Inspired by Nobuyoshi Araki’s images and their mixture of raw violence and beauty, I study the relationship between man and nature by referring to the Japanese bondage tradition. The Japanese word for bondage, kinbaku-bi, literally means “the beauty of tight binding”. It is a delicate balance between being held together and being on the verge of breaking.

I search spaces where nature’s elements combine to create interesting natural tensions and continue this dialogue trough my interpretations by extending, wrapping and pulling upon these indigenous forms. I create a new sense of volume from the existing components.”

 

Anna Reivilä – ‘Bond’

Anna Reivilä – ‘Bond’

 

source artist statement

 

Jo Injeung – ‘Mysteries of Jeju Island’

Jo Injeung’s series ‘Mysteries of Jeju Island’ – “a journey to the heart of the island, where the perpetual motion of nature is captured by the eye of the camera, discovering timelessness in a frozen moment.”

Jo Injeung – Mysteries of Jeju Island

Jo Injeung – Mysteries of Jeju Island

 

“Jeju Island is the biggest island and the smallest province of South Korea. It is a hidden gem in Asia with its pristine forests, volcanoes, and waterfalls; a World Heritage site; a true mecca for Korean travelers.
Jo Injeung’s photographs not only capture the original beauty of Jeju Island but also make a reference to the concept of four elements, significant to the Korean culture. All four elements unite in Jeju-do, constituting the island’s greatest mystery.”

 

Jo Injeung – Mysteries of Jeju Island

Jo Injeung – Mysteries of Jeju Island

 

source Rosphoto.Museum and L’Œil de la Photographie

 

David Robin – ‘Dreams of the Kings’

David Robin’s series ‘Dreams of the Kings’ – the Palace of Versailles and the Châteaux of the Loire in tracing the essence of the collective Western aesthetic initiated by the visionaries of the renaissance and realized through the fulfilled dreams of two French kings who imagined it on a grand scale.

David Robin - Dreams of the Kings

David Robin – Dreams of the Kings

 

“I’ve created this collection of images as evidence of the aesthetic dreams and visions of Françoise I and Louis XIV (The Sun King) of France, and to speak to their indelible impact on our collective visual conscience. Both men — in their own times and in their own ways — moved the world towards beauty. Françoise I brought Humanism and the Italian Renaissance to France and introduced his countrymen to the genius of Da Vinci. Louis XIV, through his example and, some would say, because of his narcissism established an aesthetic priority and placed an importance on the grand and the beautiful still very much in evidence today.”

 

David Robin - Dreams of the Kings

David Robin – Dreams of the Kings

 

source artist statement

 

Gabriella Imperatori-Penn – ‘Luminous + Shadow’

Gabriella Imperatori-Penn’s series ‘Luminous + Shadow’ – still lifes of pebbles as an inner, quiet conversation with the world about duality.

Gabriella Imperatori-Penn - Luminous + Shadow

Gabriella Imperatori-Penn – Luminous + Shadow

 

“On one of her journeys to Greece Gabriella Imperatori-Penn fell in love with the stone beaches of Chios. The water upon the stones made the most amazingly calming sounds which were emotionally moving and inspiring. In 2009 she photographed these stones in the studio with a focus that felt like a Buddhist meditation expressing that she saw each and every stone as it’s own peaceful universe or planet.” (Space SBH)

 

Thierry Urbain – ‘Anamnesis’

“The truth about reality is always in our souls. The whole of searching and learning is recollection. “ Socrates

Thierry Urbain - Anamnesis

Thierry Urbain – Anamnesis

 

Thierry Urbain’s series ‘Anamnesis’* – a journey through Mediterranean landscapes as a process of remembrance inspired by Plato’s concept of innate knowledge of everything and part of the circle of human’s life.

Plato suggested in his ‘Meno’ via Socrates’ words, that “since the soul is immortal and has been born many times, she has beheld all things in this world and the next, and there is nothing she has not learnt, so it is not surprising that she can remember what she once knew about virtue and other things.” Knowledge is in the soul from eternity, but each time the soul incarnates, its knowledge is forgotten at the moment of birth.

With lot of grain and reminiscent of a diary, the artist illustrates the idea of re-awakening (an– = un-, amnesis = forgetting, as in amnesia) and recovery of what one has forgotten, especially moral, existential, spiritual.

 

Thierry Urbain - Anamnesis

Thierry Urbain – Anamnesis

 

*Anamnesis /ˌænæmˈniːsɪs/, Ancient Greek: ἀνάμνησις / Modern Greek: ανάμνηση) – recollection, reminiscence, remembrance.

 

Thierry Urbain - Anamnesis

Thierry Urbain – Anamnesis

 

 

Platon Antoniou – ‘Coming home Greece’

Platon Antoniou’s project ‘Coming home Greece’ – a personal story capturing with his iconic style the essence of the Greek soul through common people of everyday life from the Isle of Paros.

Platon Antoniou - Coming home Greece

Platon Antoniou – Coming home Greece

 

“The camera is nothing more than a tool of communication, simplicity, shapes on a page. What is important is the story, the message, the feeling, the connection… My father used to do beautiful black and white drawings and I grew up with this sort of aesthetic in my head. It was so bold! I spent most of my adult life trying to find this visual language. If it is necessary, it is in there. If it is not necessary, it is not there. So strip it down, simplify it. Just go for the core…

My 35mm stuff is about context and atmosphere. It is not always about all the details I would get in a studio setting. The only thing is to focus on compassion, dignity and humility. It is a very powerful connection.

When I came back to Greece, I came back to my people and it was an unpaired experience of finding my feet as a human being.”  (quotations from the Netflix documentary series Abstract: The Art of Design, Platon: Photography).

 

Awoiska van der Molen – ‘Nature’

Awoiska van der Molen - Nature (2015-2016)

Awoiska van der Molen – Nature (2015-2016)

 

Awoiska van der Molen‘s series ‘Nature’  –  in search of solitude where divine projects itself as part of the collective memory.

“The sense of the divine is an experience rather than a concept, a revelation rather than an intellectual construct… I recognise every photo by Awoiska van der Molen, I have been to all those places. I know the joy of saplings, the passion of a shrub, the sudden horror of the ravine, the lustiness of a tree stump, the untold doom in the darkest reaches of the undergrowth. These are not photos of or after Nature, the photos are part of that same Nature, of an event enabled by Nature via her camera at that particular point in time and that particular exposure.” (Arjen Mulder)

 

Awoiska van der Molen - Nature (2015-2016)

Awoiska van der Molen – Nature (2015-2016)

 

Klea McKenna – ‘Automatic Earth’

Klea McKenna’s series of photograms ‘Automatic Earth’ – tree circles as a nature stamp of human emotions.

“Automatic Earth refers to what I see as a “blue print” that exists within nature; a plan within each organism to automatically generate a particular form or pattern that is then, inevitably flawed. I approach these broken patterns within the landscape as allegories for human emotional experience. It is where the pattern breaks that we are told something: a draught, a trauma, an interaction, the slash of a chainsaw…. a crack in the earth. The flaws in these pre-destined forms become a record of time and of labor and they tell the story of the life that made them.”

Klea McKenna - Automatic Earth

Klea McKenna – Automatic Earth