B&W

Dag Alveng – ‘I Love This Time of Year’

Dag Alveng’s series ‘I Love This Time of Year’ – multi-exposure photographs from New York streets interweaving time and space of metropolis like a quantum kaleidoscope with infinite variations of urban reality. Constructed in aesthetic symmetrical cross formed rotations, these photographs broaden the perception and ability to recognize the modern world and focus on the possibilities that acquired special meaning as an individual piece of reality.

Dag Alveng - I Love This Time of Year

Dag Alveng – I Love This Time of Year

 

 

Paul Hart – ‘Truncated’

Paul Hart’s series ‘Truncated’ (2005 – 2008) – through individual portraits of trees depicting their characters and personalities, the artist captured the spirituality, the primeval and the mystery of an ageing pine forest plantation in Derbyshire, England, as an unaffected by the modern world place of inner peace and infinity.

Paul Hart - Truncated

Paul Hart – Truncated

 

“A lot of these pictures were taken towards the end of the day when the light was going. It is quite ethereal then. The twilight in the forest appeared to be glowing on the branches of these trees, but only the branches – everything else was quite dark… The tightly knitted images of trees – themselves almost becoming anthropomorphic forms – show an environment where nature has self-created shelter and protection from its own elemental chaos… When you are photographing you look at it closer than normally would and be aware of the character that was portrayed and with a bit of humour I gave them names.”

The series was published in a book in 2008 by Dewi Lewis Publishing.

 

Flore – ‘Lointains souvenirs’

Flore’s series ‘Lointains souvenirs’ – a slow long-distance journey to Indochina in the company of her grandmother and the French writer and experimental filmmaker Marguerite Duras, who both lived there once at the same time and locations.

Flore - Lointains souvenirs

Flore – Lointains souvenirs

 

It is neither a documentary of her family history nor an interpretation of the mythologies of the author. This is an intimate adventure to capture the echoes of two women’s voices and along with her own to compose a new delicate story woven from threads of melancholy tones, timeless memories and nostalgic poetry.

Guided by Marguerite Duras’s knowledge of the places in her works, Flore walked along the banks of Mekong River, the rice paddies of southern Cochin China, entered colonial houses, to find the atmosphere evoked by the imaginary she had created about these past times while visiting her grandmother’s house. This is not a simple tale about ordinary harmony and beauty, but through a kind of haze and blurred horizon, the artist immersed us into a fascinating world with enigmatic landscapes, mysterious roads and dreamlike buildings.

The series is published in a book.

 

RongRong & inri – ‘Tsumari Story’

RongRong & inri’s ‘Tsumari Story’ – a tale about a man, a woman and their three children capturing their experiences and emotional journey in a unique and rural area as a response to primeval concepts of ‘the circle of life’ and ‘humanity as part of nature’.

The series was produced in Niigata Prefecture, one of Japan’s snowiest regions, between 2012 and 2014, following to an invitation by the Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennial. Because its transport network was comparatively late to upgrade, it has somewhat escaped the effects of the globalization. There, time flows according to its own rhythm and the lifestyles of those who still inhabit the villages haven’t changed for centuries.

RongRong & inri - Tsumari Story

RongRong & inri – Tsumari Story

 

“Our original intention for this series was to reflect a worldview based on the image created by the origin of the name of this area, “Tsumari” and its local legends. We wandered through the snow-covered maze with no clear objective, imagining a story of a man and woman who are seized by extreme emotions while living within Tsumari’s harsh natural environment.”

Available as photo book.

Amy Friend – ‘Dare alla Luce’

In her series ‘Dare alla Luce’, Amy Friend is a fairy, who by piercing holes with a magic wand allowed spots of light to pass through vintage photographs, bursting into stardust and playing like fireflies, “to bring them to light”, as a moment of re-birth of the lost souls and their stories.

Amy Friend - Dare alla Luce

Amy Friend – Dare alla Luce

 

“I am not specifically concerned with capturing a “concrete” reality in my photographs… Through hand-manipulated interventions I alter and subsequently re-photograph the images “re-making” photographs that oscillate between what is present and absent. I aim to comment on the fragile quality of the photographic object but also on the fragility of our lives, our history. All are lost so easily. By employing the tools of photography, I “re-use” light, allowing it to shine through the holes. In a playful and yet, literal manner, I return the subjects of the photographs back to the light, while simultaneously bringing them forward. I play with the light and use it metaphorically allowing for new readings, sometimes through heavy-handed applications and at other times delicately. The images are permanently altered; they are lost and reborn…”

 

Kikuji Kawada – ‘The Last Cosmology’

Kikuji Kawada‘s series ‘The Last Cosmology’ – deeply emotional imagery of mainly stars, eclipses, cloudscapes and other celestial phenomena as a chronicle of the dramas in the skies and symbols of life and death, and the fragile nature of our existence.

The photographs were captured between 1980 and 2000, feeling a sense of nostalgic void caused by two historical events on earth: the death of the Emperor Hirohito in 1989 and the Showa Era in Japan ending with him, and the end of 20th century.

Kikuji Kawada - The Last Cosmology

Kikuji Kawada – The Last Cosmology

 

“I was born at the beginning of the Showa Era. There was a great war during my boyhood and then I lived during the period of re-construction and growth and now I slowly approach the evening of life. Through these photographs the cosmology is an illusion of the firmament at the same time it includes the reality of an era and also the cosmology of a changing heart… I imagine the era and myself as an implicitly intermingling catastrophe… I want to spy on the depths of a multihued heart that is like a Karman vortex.”

Published in a photo book by Mack.

Keith Taylor – ‘Otherworld’

Keith Taylor’s series ‘Otherworld’ – the geography of our desire and curiosity.

From the dawn of its existence, mankind creates mythological homes for gods, and mythical other worlds of hope or doom. Because of our limited perception these places often share characteristics with our familiar earthly landscapes.

Keith Taylor - Otherworld

Keith Taylor – Otherworld

 

“The photographs of barren terrains were taken in the upper Midwest to render possible models of the Earth-like planets currently being sought by NASA’s Kepler mission, and it also references the mythologies of many cultures that establish a land that is home to spiritual beings or the dead… I am using photographs of real places to suggest realms that may or may not exist.”

 

Ross Faircloth – ‘Evidence of Chance’

Ross Faircloth’s series ‘Evidence of Chance’ – back to the conventional elements in photography, light, time, light-sensitive materials and photo-chemistry, and experimenting with the chance in search for a new way of seeing.

Ross Faircloth - Evidence of Chance

Ross Faircloth – Evidence of Chance

 

“This process began by turning traditional darkroom paper, the light sensitive material, into the camera itself.  It was then either covered in black cloth and taken outside to expose and create a recognizable image or left outside and unprotected for weeks to months at a time to expose not only to light but also the harsh Texas environment to incorporate the element of chance.  The paper cameras left to ‘chance’ were also manipulated through application of photo-chemistry, some before and some after their extended time exposing outside.  This allowed for another element of chance in the work through the use of abstract expressionism techniques.  The use of abstract expressionism creates an interesting conversation in relation to photography, as abstract expressionism is a visual recording, until now, in paint, of an action or event that is itself the content for the work of art.  Oddly enough, you could define photography in the same way.”

 

Pavlina Ecclesiarhou – ‘Epitaphs’

Pavlina Ecclesiarhou’s series of hand painted monochromatic photographs of animals ‘Epitaphs’ – stories between the lines about our collective responsibility as humans.

Inspired by the dioramas in Natural History museums and exploring the theme of what is reality and its subjective effect on a personal memory, the artist opens a dialogue about timelessness of nature and our share in it, and whose epitaph we actually discuss …

Pavlina Ecclesiarhou - Epitaphs

Pavlina Ecclesiarhou – Epitaphs

 

“I invite the viewer to stop, experience a moment of uncertainty, perceiving it as a photograph, or a painting, questioning perception and consciousness, and in doing this, re-considering the relationship of illusion to reality. I also invite the viewer to contemplate the silent stories of these animals and consider why they matter to us… An epitaph is the writing on a tombstone. It speaks of mourning. My photographs are both an ode to nature’s grandeur and a lament about our waning connection to it. One is left with both a sense of awe as well as grief, that a harmonious coexistence might be an illusion. Yet, the overriding feeling is that of the urgent responsibility we have to halt the disappearance of animal species and their worlds because they do matter.”

 

Michael Schnabel – ‘Stille Berge’ and ‘Weisses Land Skizzen’

Michael Schnabel’s sophisticated landscapes with quiet mountains, almost unrealistic and abstract, in his series ‘Stille Berge’ and ‘Weisses Land Skizzen’ – capturing the majestic silence of the Alps through mastering the lightest and the darkest verges of tranquility.

Unlikely the typical romantic Alpine Idyll, these panoramas of gigantic bodies can be sensed by contours, lines and shapes blended in such a harmonious way that you can feel the mountain more than you can see it. They are like graphic compositions of the infinite calmness and grandeur, drawn with the silk of the day and the velvet of the night.

Michael Schnabel - Stille Berge

Michael Schnabel – Stille Berge

 

“The night and its silence gives the mountains a sublimity, feeling of raw creation and aloofness that I strived to capture in my work.  Exposure times were about an hour; a sharp contrast to the city images which required only a few minutes. Focusing and even framing the image through the ground glass was another issue, as there was precious little to see under the low light conditions… Sometimes it was so dark, that I oriented myself only with the compass… Even at night there are colors in nature; they are important to me, even if they are very subtle.”

 

Michael Schnabel - Weisses Land Skizzen

Michael Schnabel – Weisses Land Skizzen

 

“In these raw virgin landscapes I found tranquility, not only at night, but also during the day. This allowed me to work during the day. These locations have a clarity and depth that one can feel. This body of work is a subjective image of these awe inspiring natural spaces where I am – once again – experimenting with the boundaries of photography as they relate to paintings or works on paper which is best noticeable in the original.”