B&W

Gabriella Imperatori-Penn – ‘Luminous + Shadow’

Gabriella Imperatori-Penn’s series ‘Luminous + Shadow’ – still lifes of pebbles as an inner, quiet conversation with the world about duality.

Gabriella Imperatori-Penn - Luminous + Shadow

Gabriella Imperatori-Penn – Luminous + Shadow

 

“On one of her journeys to Greece Gabriella Imperatori-Penn fell in love with the stone beaches of Chios. The water upon the stones made the most amazingly calming sounds which were emotionally moving and inspiring. In 2009 she photographed these stones in the studio with a focus that felt like a Buddhist meditation expressing that she saw each and every stone as it’s own peaceful universe or planet.” (Space SBH)

 

Thierry Urbain – ‘Anamnesis’

“The truth about reality is always in our souls. The whole of searching and learning is recollection. “ Socrates

Thierry Urbain - Anamnesis

Thierry Urbain – Anamnesis

 

Thierry Urbain’s series ‘Anamnesis’* – a journey through Mediterranean landscapes as a process of remembrance inspired by Plato’s concept of innate knowledge of everything and part of the circle of human’s life.

Plato suggested in his ‘Meno’ via Socrates’ words, that “since the soul is immortal and has been born many times, she has beheld all things in this world and the next, and there is nothing she has not learnt, so it is not surprising that she can remember what she once knew about virtue and other things.” Knowledge is in the soul from eternity, but each time the soul incarnates, its knowledge is forgotten at the moment of birth.

With lot of grain and reminiscent of a diary, the artist illustrates the idea of re-awakening (an– = un-, amnesis = forgetting, as in amnesia) and recovery of what one has forgotten, especially moral, existential, spiritual.

 

Thierry Urbain - Anamnesis

Thierry Urbain – Anamnesis

 

*Anamnesis /ˌænæmˈniːsɪs/, Ancient Greek: ἀνάμνησις / Modern Greek: ανάμνηση) – recollection, reminiscence, remembrance.

 

Thierry Urbain - Anamnesis

Thierry Urbain – Anamnesis

 

 

Platon Antoniou – ‘Coming home Greece’

Platon Antoniou’s project ‘Coming home Greece’ – a personal story capturing with his iconic style the essence of the Greek soul through common people of everyday life from the Isle of Paros.

Platon Antoniou - Coming home Greece

Platon Antoniou – Coming home Greece

 

“The camera is nothing more than a tool of communication, simplicity, shapes on a page. What is important is the story, the message, the feeling, the connection… My father used to do beautiful black and white drawings and I grew up with this sort of aesthetic in my head. It was so bold! I spent most of my adult life trying to find this visual language. If it is necessary, it is in there. If it is not necessary, it is not there. So strip it down, simplify it. Just go for the core…

My 35mm stuff is about context and atmosphere. It is not always about all the details I would get in a studio setting. The only thing is to focus on compassion, dignity and humility. It is a very powerful connection.

When I came back to Greece, I came back to my people and it was an unpaired experience of finding my feet as a human being.”  (quotations from the Netflix documentary series Abstract: The Art of Design, Platon: Photography).

 

Awoiska van der Molen – ‘Nature’

Awoiska van der Molen - Nature (2015-2016)

Awoiska van der Molen – Nature (2015-2016)

 

Awoiska van der Molen‘s series ‘Nature’  –  in search of solitude where divine projects itself as part of the collective memory.

“The sense of the divine is an experience rather than a concept, a revelation rather than an intellectual construct… I recognise every photo by Awoiska van der Molen, I have been to all those places. I know the joy of saplings, the passion of a shrub, the sudden horror of the ravine, the lustiness of a tree stump, the untold doom in the darkest reaches of the undergrowth. These are not photos of or after Nature, the photos are part of that same Nature, of an event enabled by Nature via her camera at that particular point in time and that particular exposure.” (Arjen Mulder)

 

Awoiska van der Molen - Nature (2015-2016)

Awoiska van der Molen – Nature (2015-2016)

 

Klea McKenna – ‘Automatic Earth’

Klea McKenna’s series of photograms ‘Automatic Earth’ – tree circles as a nature stamp of human emotions.

“Automatic Earth refers to what I see as a “blue print” that exists within nature; a plan within each organism to automatically generate a particular form or pattern that is then, inevitably flawed. I approach these broken patterns within the landscape as allegories for human emotional experience. It is where the pattern breaks that we are told something: a draught, a trauma, an interaction, the slash of a chainsaw…. a crack in the earth. The flaws in these pre-destined forms become a record of time and of labor and they tell the story of the life that made them.”

Klea McKenna - Automatic Earth

Klea McKenna – Automatic Earth

 

 

Elaine Duigenan – Blossfeldt’s Apprentice

Elaine Duigenan’s series ‘Blossfeldt’s Apprentice’ –  hand-made recreations of Karl Blossfeldt’s iconic images of botanical specimens in an attempt to show human’s imperfection in imitating the original forms of nature. Yet in these limitations, there is a momentary state of alignment with its perfection in the reflection of the idea of creative process and giving a life to new objects.

Elaine Duigenan - Blossfeldt's Apprentice

Elaine Duigenan – Blossfeldt’s Apprentice

 

 

Abelardo Morell – ‘Flowers for Lisa’

Abelardo Morell - Flowers for Lisa

Abelardo Morell – Flowers for Lisa

 

Abelardo Morell’s series ‘Flowers for Lisa’ – a delirium of floral still life with all sorts of influences—painting, music, design, fashion, philosophy, started as a birthday gift for his wife instead of a bouquet of actual flowers.

“However, something in the making of that first photograph gave me a newly found spark to experiment in ways I had not done before.

I chose the subject of flowers because they are lovely things – often exchanged between lovers – and they are part of the long tradition of still life in art. Precisely because flowers are such a conventional subject, I felt a strong desire to describe them in new, inventive ways.

Abelardo Morell - Flowers for Lisa

Abelardo Morell – Flowers for Lisa

 

I love the way Jan Brueghel, Edouard Manet, Georgia O’Keefe, Giorgio Morandi, Irving Penn and Joan Mitchell, reworked the look of common flowers to show unexpected versions of them. The subject of the photographs in my work may be flowers, but they are also pictures about perspective, love, jealousy, hate, geometry, sex, life, the passage of time and death. I love how in choosing to limit myself to one discrete subject I was able to open doors into a world where I felt inventive, improvisational and fresh.”

Abelardo Morell - Flowers for Lisa

Abelardo Morell – Flowers for Lisa

 

The series is published in a book by Abrams.

Abelardo Morell - Flowers for Lisa

Abelardo Morell – Flowers for Lisa

 

Lola Montserrat – ‘Fràgils’

Lola Montserrat’s series ‘Fràgils’ – capturing the aura of flowers old, wise, vivid in collodion portraits to transcend the viewer into the memory of a nature.

“Passage of time. Life and death. The eternal future and the inevitable transformation that allows us to live. Extracted from time brief moments of existence become eternal in these images and invites us to contemplate the beauty of the flowers and their secret that we can never possess.”

Lola Montserrat - Fràgils

Lola Montserrat – Fràgils

 

 

Simon Chaput – ‘Jantar Mantar’

Simon Chaput - Jantar Mantar

Simon Chaput – Jantar Mantar

 

Playing with abstraction and negative space, Simon Chaput creates a series of dynamic compositions with the striking combinations of geometrical forms of the stone observatory ‘Jantar Mantar’ in Jaipur. Through dramatic angles and close-ups, the artists revives human’s quest for unveiling celestial mysteries and the eternal longing for a cosmic connection with the universe.

Simon Chaput - Jantar Mantar

Simon Chaput – Jantar Mantar

 

Built in the 18th century for the study of astronomy, there are five Jantar Mantars in India, all with an eccentric design, of which the largest is in Jaipur.

Jantar Mantar in Jaipur was constructed by Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh. It consists of 19 instruments including Vrihat Samrat Yantra, which is the Biggest Sun Clock in the World. Relying primarily on Indian astronomy, the purpose of the complex was to give reading of the trajectory of the planets and stars, predict eclipses, measure local time and other cosmic events. The monument is a part of the UNESCO World Heritage.

Simon Chaput - Jantar Mantar

Simon Chaput – Jantar Mantar

 

The series is published in a book by Nazraeli Press with a short story by the renowned author Salman Rushdie, written specifically to accompany Chaput’s dramatically beautiful photographs.

Simon Chaput - Jantar Mantar

Simon Chaput – Jantar Mantar

 

Tom Jacobi – ‘Into the Light’

Tom Jacobi’s series ‘Into the Light’ – breathtaking landscapes that unfold a timeless power of the white color on our visual and psychological perception as fundamental, magical and symbolic, to offer space for contemplation and encourage us to look to the future.

Tom Jacobi - Into the Light

Tom Jacobi – Into the Light

 

The work presents Part Two of the trilogy Awakening started in 2014 with the project Grey Matter(s). Whilst the Part One illustrates, by means of a reduction to an almost colourless world, the way man emerged from the darkness, the current series focus is on the white, dazzling as a colour of light.

“White occupies a particular position in the spectrum of colours. White is, like black and grey, an achromatic colour. Ultimately, it is not a colour at all – or to put it differently: white is the sum of all colours, the sum of all wavelengths within the visible range. It thus arouses the same impression of colour as sunlight. There is almost no context in which white is seen as negative. This results not least from the fact that white is often regarded as the antithesis of its opposite, black. We experience white as the positive gaze into brightness, whereas black is seen as negative, like gazing into darkness. White is affirmation; black is negation. White has echoes of purity and spotlessness. It is the symbol of transparency and transcendence… White is associated with divine light and is used in practically all religions for the representation of the superordinate, the divine. Man needs white, the brightest of all colours, for survival, because it provides support in a world without stability.”

Tom Jacobi - Into the Light

Tom Jacobi – Into the Light

 

It took the artist two years to complete this work. He travelled back and forth across the world, “searching once more for archaic landscapes which either dominate by virtue of their light or open up to the light in unique moments.”

The two parts of the trilogy provide opportunities for contemplation on the opposite ends of light – its presence and absence around us. The third and final part examines the state of ‘The Light Within’, to illustrate the artist’s skills of reducing to the essential and to conclude that the real light is within us.

Tom Jacobi - Into the Light

Tom Jacobi – Into the Light

 

The series is published in a book by Hirmer Publishers.