books

Michael Eastman – ‘Havana’

The silent Michael Eastman‘s ‘Havana’ – a nostalgic trip to a faded glory, past grandeur and decaying prosperity.

‘Painterly in quality, these richly colored photographs are dramatically lit and exquisitely detailed. Though mostly devoid of people, they manage to capture contemporary Cuban life through suggestion: an empty chair, an ancient car, a decrepit hallway, a forgotten chandelier. The result is as eloquent as a love poem written to a city rich in history, culture, and feeling.’

photography, Michael  Eastman, Havana, fine art photography, Cuba, old buildings, interiors, facades, nostalgia

Michael Eastman – Havana

 

Available as a photo book published by Prestel.

 

Choi Byung-Kwan – ‘Bamboo’

Bamboo‘ by Choi Byung-Kwan

“The place of bamboo in the minds of East Asian people goes far beyond our imagination. Because Bamboo grows tall and straight by emptying its body and creating voids within, so it has been praised as a representative of uprightness and emptiness. Especially, Korea, Japan and China all placed bamboo in the first rank of evergreens, even surpassing the pine tree, and gave bamboo the first place for its nobility of soul. Scholars believed that the scent of bamboo expresses a world of pure ideal, and thought they would enter a pure spiritual world when they went into a bamboo forest because of the scent of spirit represented by bamboo.” Jin Dongsun

photography, Choi Byung Kwan, bamboo, panorama, BWphotography, fine art photography, forest, inspiration, nobility of soul, Korean photographers, Asian aesthetics

Choi Byung-Kwan – Bamboo

 

Available as a self-published photo book.

 

Joakim Eskildsen – ‘Nordic Signs’

Joakim Eskildsen‘s ‘Nordic Signs‘-  a poetic reflection, a hymn to nature and the people who live in Northern Europe.

From 1989 to 1994 Danish photographer Joakim Eskildsen travelled through Norway, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Iceland and the Faroe Islands in searching of those elements that define the mystic atmosphere of the land and its relationship with those who inhabit it.

“I think that I managed to capture here the meaning of the Nordic Signs, something that is at the same time wild yet livable, and profoundly shaped by the climate, the wind, and destiny.”

Joakim Eskildsen, photography, Nordic Signs, landscape, nature, people, Northern Europe, art, fine art photography, photo books, photography books, inspiration

Joakim Eskildsen – Nordic Signs

 

The photographs were self-published in a book ‘Nordic Signs’ in 1995, but now it is out of print and sought after.

 

Darren Almond – ‘Fullmoon’

Darren Almond’s series ‘Fullmoon’ – a long exposure and the invisible landscape turns to a visible meditation.

Darren Almond - Fullmoon

Darren Almond – Fullmoon

 

“Light generates life – this is why we are drawn to it, but contrary to the harsh light of the sun, the reflective light of the moon makes us see further. The landscape of the night is an emotional landscape as much as it is a physical landscape.”

The first photographs on nights with a full moon, English artist Darren Almond took in 1998 initiated an experiment, which he called Fifteen Minute Moon. This became the starting point to an ongoing series of works, now known as ‘Fullmoon‘ and available as a photo book published by Taschen.

“The moon is the sculpture, that belongs to everybody on the planet. It’s a small glimmer of light between two voids of darkness. The moon to me is a historical point, a point we can relate to. Everything beyond the moon is just too far away, is beyond language.”

To learn more about the artist’s thoughts behind the series of full moon pictures, watch his interview for Louisiana Channel

 

Darren Almond - Fullmoon

Darren Almond – Fullmoon

 

 

Gunter Pfannmüller – ‘In search of dignity’

Photographer Gunter Pfannmüller along with writer Wilhelm Klein were the first photojournalists allowed into Burma in 1980. With the help of a photography portrait studio that they created, for over 35 years they have been photographing the country’s different ethnic groups. As a consequence, the project ‘In search of dignity‘ was produced, selling over a million copies and printed in 12 languages.

“The relationship between the photography and human dignity has always been ambivalent. Precisely when meeting what we Europeans consider exotic, the inquiring camera all too frequently destroys what it seeks to capture: the uniqueness of each individual. Treading this fine line can only succeed in an atmosphere that establishes closeness while maintaining distance. With a delicate feel for the details that visually manifest personality. And, not least, with the patience to trust the right moment.”

Gunter Pfannmüller, photography, In search of Dignity

Gunter Pfannmüller – In search of Dignity

 

The project is available as photo book in English and German editions.

 

Masahisa Fukase – ‘The solitude of ravens’

Japanese photographer Masahisa Fukase made his obscure masterpiece ‘Ravens’ (‘Karasu’) between 1975 and 1982 as a way of overcoming a personal emotional trauma following a divorce with his second wife Yōko Wanibe. Though the photographs at first sight are a personal lament reflecting the darkened vision of the photographer himself, they are regarded by many as the most important body of work to come out of postwar Japan, and still its imagery continues to inspire artists and writers today.

Masahisa Fukase - Ravens

Masahisa Fukase – Ravens

 

The project originated as an eight-part series for the magazine Camera Mainichi  and these photo essays reveal that Fukase experimented with multiple exposure printing and narrative text as part of the development of the Karasu concept. The first book was published in 1986, subsequent editions were published in 1991 and and 2008, and in May, 2017 a new one published by Mack Books.

“Ravens is one of the defining bodies of work in the history of photography and a high point in the photo book genre. This accumulation of accolades, and the passing of time, have obscured much of the fascinating detail which explains the artist’s pre-occupation with this motif throughout his work. It was not simply a reflection of the existential angst and anhedonia he suffered throughout his life but manifested in artistic self-identification with the raven and ultimately spiralled into a solitary existence and artistic practice on the edge of madness…” Tomo Kosuga from his essay Cries of Solitude [2017]

 

Masahisa Fukase - Ravens

Masahisa Fukase – Ravens

 

 

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly – ‘For My Daughters’

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly’s series ‘For My Daughters‘ – a beautiful and thoughtful dialogue between mother and daughter, between words and images, between time and space.

When she was still a teenager, Dorothy Monnelly discovered in the attic of their home, a box of her mother’s poems. They were written between 1920 – 1945 and left as her “creative” legacy for her daughters.

The series consists of floral stills and landscape photographs and is published as a photo book “For My Daughters”.

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly - For My Daughters, Floral Stills

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly – For My Daughters, Floral Stills

 

“I have always treasured my mother’s poetry. When reading it recently, she gave me the idea of combining my images with her poetry to create a conversation back and forth about the idea expressed in each poem. She felt that we would understand each other, and writes in a poem to her daughters:

The pattern born within my mind

Is latent in their own. My wisdom

May not be profound, but they will recognize

Its likeness in their blood and bone.

It has been said that my photography shows the extraordinary in the ordinary; the same comment has been made regarding my mother’s poetry.”

 

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly - For My Daughters, Landscapes

Dorothy Kerper Monnelly – For My Daughters, Landscapes

 

 

Inge Morath – ‘On Style’

Inge Morath (1923–2002) new book ‘On Style‘.

Famous Austrian photographer “may have frequently photographed well-dressed people and many figures of the fashion world, but to call her a fashion photographer would be a mistake”, according to John P. Jacob, the McEvoy Family curator for photography at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. “Whether photographing festivals or artists’ studios, on films sets, the street, or the fashion runway, what distinguishes Morath’s photography is an unerring eye for life’s brilliant theatricality”

Inge Morath, photobook On Style, photography

Inge Morath – On Style

 

Tom Jacobi – ‘Grey Matter(s)’

Tom Jacobi‘s project ‘Grey Matter(s)‘ –  “Grey is mystical. We humans love the sun and are always thought to have yearned for light. Yet prayers are mostly said in the dark. We may well strive for light, but are we possibly, in fact, children of the twilight, a colorless world in which everything is gray?”

Tom Jacobi - Grey Matter(s)

Tom Jacobi – Grey Matter(s)

 

The project is available as photo book with more than seventy striking photographs of some of the most spectacular wonders of the natural world, which took him over two years and travelling to six continents.