books

Cig Harvey – ‘Gardening at Night’

Cig Harvey’s ‘Gardening at Night’ – a personal collection that captures an experience of the world that is at once otherworldly and yet instantly familiar.

Cig Harvey - Gardening at night

Cig Harvey – Gardening at night

 

“The narrative throughout has a delicious element of magical realism – the viewer is left with the feeling of waking within a dream. On the other hand there is familiarity in what she evokes – something primal and instinctual that points to each person’s connection to nature. Seasons figure prominently as metaphors for the cycle of life, and interplays between shadow and light underscore the work.“

The series is included in a photo book, where the artist’s photographs are interwoven with her intimate poetry.

To learn more about the artist’s life path and thoughts behind the series watch her presentation at School of Visual Arts

 

Hiroshi Watanabe – ‘Findings’

Hiroshi Watanabe’s ‘Findings’ – “These are honest and direct pictures; they bear a heavy silence, and are uncomplicated, singular ideas. These words invite a closer look uncompromised by time. They suggest a meditation that can bring to the surface what could otherwise have remained hidden – that opening in the sky beyond the child and his maze, and what it can mean.” Anthoy Bannon, George Eastman House Director

Hiroshi Watanabe - Findings

Hiroshi Watanabe – Findings

 

“My photographs reflect both genuine interest in my subject as well as a respect for the element of serendipity, while other times I seek pure beauty. The pure enjoyment of this process drives and inspires me. I believe there’s a thread that connects all of my work — my personal vision of the world as a whole. I make every effort to be a faithful visual recorder of the world around me, a world in flux that, at very least in my mind, deserves preservation.”

The photographs are available as a photo book.

 

Ingar Krauss – ‘Nature Morte’

Ingar Krauss’s series ‘Nature Morte’ is an ongoing project started in 2010 of still life ‘portraits’ of vegetables, fruits, grains, flowers and animals.

“I am interested in the hidden relationship between the inner life of human beings and the world of plants and animals and I want to transmute those commonplace subjects by a process of replacing inattention with contemplation.”

Krauss prints in black and white and subsequently paints every photo with a transparent oil paint by attributing to the images a nostalgic vein in the romantic tradition (the paint, very diluted, does not cover the image but colors it subtly).

photography, Ingar Krauss, Nature Morte, still life photography, fine art photography, vegetables, flowers, gardening

Ingar Krauss – Nature Morte

 

To date 39 images are collected in a photo book published by Hartmann Books.

If you want to learn more about the series, read the artist’s interview for Fine Dining Lovers.

 

Stephen Gill – ‘Best Before End’

Stephen Gill – ‘Best Before End’ – not allowed to be tired in the modern 24-hour society.

With a direct physical presence of energy drinks in the images, Stephen Gill’s focus in his series ‘Best Before End’ is on the danger upon our inner life due to the gradually growing addiction of energy drinks consumption.

Stephen Gill - Best Before End

Stephen Gill – Best Before End

 

“The colour negative films were part-processed and soaked in energy drink, which caused image shifts and disruptions and softened the film emulsion. This softening allowed for manual stretching, moving, tearing and distortion of the layers of film emulsion to take place, and further manual shifts were added with a soft brush while the emulsion was still pliable. All the drinks were sourced in East London, which is also where the images were made.”

Available as a 72-pages photo book published in 2014 by Nobody in association with Archive of Modern Conflict.

 

Yoshinori Mizutani – ‘Yusurika’

Yusurika’ – a series of ‘dancing fairies’ in a fantastical performance created by nature and orchestrated by Yoshinori Mizutani.

‘Yusurika’ means ‘buzzer midge’ – a tiny insect that looks like mosquito but is a non-biting. It tends to fly in large swarms and creates a mild buzzing sound, that how it got its name.

What inspiring might exist in this? Only if you have the vision of Japanese photographer Yoshinori Mizutani to see through his camera lens fairies instead. They radiate an almost palpable kinetic energy when reflected in the camera flash and transform the place into a sparkling, magical realm.

Yoshinori Mizutani, photography, yusurika, fairies, art, nature, landscape, Tokyo, fine art photography, photo books, photography books, inspiration

Yoshinori Mizutani – Yusurika

 

Having grown up in a small town surrounded by rich wildlife and nature Yoshinori Mizutani learned how to make conversations with the natural world. “Surrounded by mountains, with young leaves and flowers on the trees, fireflies around the creeks, red dragonflies flying over rice paddies…a silvery world when snow fell, a place with bountiful nature—that is where I grew up.”  Even when he moved to Tokyo, nature continued to call him out to understand its feelings and expressions. “Perhaps, by facing nature, I was unconsciously catching sight of my original landscape from childhood… Or perhaps, it is only natural for us to seek nature.”

‘Yusurika’ is available as a photo book.

 

Vasantha Yogananthan – ‘A Myth of Two Souls’, book 1 ‘Early Times’

Vasantha Yogananthan’s project ‘A Myth of Two Souls’ is a contemporary retelling of the ancient Indian epic poem ‘The Ramayana’, that takes viewers on a journey through fictional and historical stories retracing the route from north to south India of the legendary prince Rama and his adventures.

Yogananthan’s series draw inspiration from the imagery associated with this myth and its pervasiveness in everyday Indian life. “The idea is to carefully play on the illusion and the ambiguity of the photograph. I shoot local people who live in these ancient, historical places. I never ask them to wear props—but since the country’s traditions are so strong, it can be hard for viewers to understand whether the work was taken yesterday or 100 years ago.”

photography, Vasantha Yogananthan, A Myth of Two Souls, Early Times, The Ramayana, epics, India, photo books, photography books, inspiration, ancient stories

Vasantha Yogananthan – A Myth of Two Souls, book Early Times

 

A Myth of Two Souls’ will be published in seven photo books within 2016-2019, one per chapter of the tale. ‘Early Times’ is the 1st chapter. To date other two chapters are also available – the 2nd one ‘The Promise’ and the 3rd one ‘The Exile’. “Within each volume, though, everything will be different: the design, the typography, the materials used, the way the text and the images relate. I want to keep each chapter fresh and distinctive since the subjects are so different from one another.”

“My aim is to leave each person with their own possibilities of imagination when they flip through the pages of my book. I wanted to strike a balance between keeping the viewer engaged while leaving ample room for subjective interpretation.  I was always intent on producing an object that could evoke something in the reader’s mind. This openness has its roots in the Ramayana itself. Unlike the Bible, there is no singular, definitive text of the poem. There are hundreds of Ramayanas that correspond to different regions, traditions, languages and more.”

The Ramayana is one of the largest ancient epics in world literature. First recorded by the Sanskrit poet Valmiki around 300 BC, ‘The Ramayana’ has many versions and has been constantly rewritten and reinterpreted through the ages, and continues to evolve today.

*the quotes in the brackets are from Vasantha Yogananthan’s interview for Lens Culture

Andreas Gefeller – ‘The Japan Series’

Andreas Gefeller’s ‘The Japan Series’ – the absence of points of reference and orientation that opens up a new perspective on familiar situations.

The main focus of the series are utility poles, but also a few plants winding around rectangular wire nets or wooden grates.

The photographer presents us two shots – one as a close-up with all the details where clearly could recognize the subject and one from a distance where the subject disappears and the innumerable cables, transformers and branches are converted into an abstract composition against a monochrome background.

“The main object of my work is not to manipulate the world, but the way of looking at it. It is important to me to leave the world the way it is. The only thing I do is to find a way to produce a perspective”

photography, Andreas Gefeller, the Japan Series, utility poles, monochrome background, art, fine art photography, inspiration, photo books, photography books

Andreas Gefeller – The Japan Series

 

‘The Japan Series’ originated on the occasion of the European Eyes on Japan project in which European photographers are invited each year to capture their impressions of this Far Eastern country on film.

It is also available as a photo book by Hatje Cantz Publishers.

 

Michael Eastman – ‘Havana’

The silent Michael Eastman‘s ‘Havana’ – a nostalgic trip to a faded glory, past grandeur and decaying prosperity.

‘Painterly in quality, these richly colored photographs are dramatically lit and exquisitely detailed. Though mostly devoid of people, they manage to capture contemporary Cuban life through suggestion: an empty chair, an ancient car, a decrepit hallway, a forgotten chandelier. The result is as eloquent as a love poem written to a city rich in history, culture, and feeling.’

photography, Michael  Eastman, Havana, fine art photography, Cuba, old buildings, interiors, facades, nostalgia

Michael Eastman – Havana

 

Available as a photo book published by Prestel.

 

Choi Byung-Kwan – ‘Bamboo’

Bamboo‘ by Choi Byung-Kwan

“The place of bamboo in the minds of East Asian people goes far beyond our imagination. Because Bamboo grows tall and straight by emptying its body and creating voids within, so it has been praised as a representative of uprightness and emptiness. Especially, Korea, Japan and China all placed bamboo in the first rank of evergreens, even surpassing the pine tree, and gave bamboo the first place for its nobility of soul. Scholars believed that the scent of bamboo expresses a world of pure ideal, and thought they would enter a pure spiritual world when they went into a bamboo forest because of the scent of spirit represented by bamboo.” Jin Dongsun

photography, Choi Byung Kwan, bamboo, panorama, BWphotography, fine art photography, forest, inspiration, nobility of soul, Korean photographers, Asian aesthetics

Choi Byung-Kwan – Bamboo

 

Available as a self-published photo book.